Vim Settings

Hi,
   Sorry for asking at the wrong place but the right question :-(. Here goes my question.

    When option "cindent" is set, then some characters like "#" etc. are positioned at the beginning of the line as soon as we insert that.
    I wanted to know that, for other characaters or words, can we do some sort of setting to get them repositioned anywhere in current line as soon as we enter them?
Thanks in advance,
Animesh
abhishek_pAsked:
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GnsCommented:
"10 months late he asks" ... Did it work out for you?

-- Glenn (Who is going through the "real-old-unlocked-questions" he has commented in)
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ahoffmannCommented:
> .. are positioned at the beginning of the line as soon as we insert that.

DO you mean that the you type in a new line:

abc#

that you end up in:

#bc
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abhishek_pAuthor Commented:
No, not exactly... But like this...

Since autoindent option is set and when I press return key, then cursor won't always be on the first column. It'll , in most cases, be in the middle of the line. So at this instance, when I type #, then it goes to
first column.
-> [Firstly]

                    foo[x] = abc;
                    #include

then it , automatically, becomes as,
-> [ secondly. It happens because "cindent" option is set.]

                    foo[x] = abc;
#include                           <---- This goes at the
                                         first column of
                                         the line.


My question is:
 When I type a word or character in the beginning of the line instead of "#include", then I should be able to place it in the beginning of the line.
        So what it would be good to me is, if somebody tells me how "cindent" does this placement for specific character/word?
Thanks and best regards,
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GnsCommented:
Ah yes, this is specially handled by cindent, since cpp macros with whitespace before the "sharp" isn't meaningful.
So you want to hack up a macro do something similar for any ol' key...
Have a look at the vim help for cindent and cinkeys etc.
In vim, type
:help cindent<Enter>

Might be useful to you.

-- Glenn
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GnsCommented:
Yup, that should do it.
See (in vim)
:help C-indenting

Should fit your ticket.

-- Glenn
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ahoffmannCommented:
-- Glenn, seems you have daylight all night long, and family send to vacation ... :-))
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GnsCommented:
:-). Not yet... They'll be going at the end of next week... And no, Stockholm really is to far from the arctic circle to get light all night long...
Not like when I studied at Lulea... If you didn't look out a window at noon during the winter, you could easily miss the grayish dusk of day (approximately 1 hour)... And in the summertime... Let's say it wasn't easy sleeping... "Whoever heard of students sleeping, when they could party":-)

-- Glenn
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