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Need Help Installing PS2 mouse

Posted on 2002-07-07
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Last Modified: 2013-12-28
I am running Win98 SE on an old computer and I'm trying to install a PS2 mouse. As the computer is old, the motherboard did not come standard with a PS2 port, however it has had one added on for as long as I've had it. Is there any way of making sure that it's working, as the computer is not detecting the ps2 mouse at all.

Many thanks
Raay
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Question by:raay
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by:slink9
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You should check the mouse on a computer with a PS2 port to see if it is working.
Does the port show up in the system settings?  If so, it should be working.  Is the port even 98SE compatible?
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by:raay
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The mouse definately works on other computers. But the port isn't on the system settings and I don't know how to install it or if 98 even supports it. How can I find that out?
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by:slink9
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You would need to know who made the port and get the drivers from their web site (if they are even available).  If the card is not labeled with a name you should be able to find an FCC ID number.  You can look that up at http://www.fcc.gov/oet/fccid/
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by:Wouter Boevink
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Why don't you use a ps/2 to serial port connector convertor?
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by:SysExpert
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I would also check all the cabling.
Sometimes cables bcome intermittent or oxidized and need to be reseated.

If you have a PS/2 card, then remove it and reseat it also.


I hope this helps !

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by:drcspy
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start the puter goto safe mode by pressing F8 during startup and takeing the 'safe mode' option........goto device manager, (you can get around the screen by using the tab and arrow keys),  and remove ALL com ports and lpt ports.....restart puter normally.....with mouse attached....it'll recognise and reinstall all the com ports etc and it'll get the mouse too.......

i've had this very exact problem and that fixed it....
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by:rayt333
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It is possible that your system will not run Win98, I had an old P75 that would run just fine with Win95 and ran OK but had some "device" problems when I used an upgrade disk to Win98.
Finally I tried to format the HD and clean install Win98 and it was 2 days trying with no success, then I went back to Win95 and it ran just great so I left it running Win95

Does your MB manufactuer have the drivers for Win98? Alot of the older systems did not get updated drivers for Win98 and will not work properly.

Tell us a little about your system, make, model, speed, CPU make, ect, ect.
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by:slink9
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Yes.  The fact that the puter didn't originally come with a PS2 port would date it quite a bit.  As long as it's a 486 or better it should run Win98, though.
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by:rayt333
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slink9
I normally agree with you but it has been proven many times that some systems (even though they meet minimum specs for Win98) will not work correctly with Win98. The generic drivers will not work for some MB's (IDE controllers, ect)
It (Win98) will work with "most" MB but you will find some that simply will never run correctly.
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by:raay
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I tried drcspy's suggestion without success. The Port isn't actually on a card. Just a plate which runs a cable to a four pin connector on the motherboard title (funnily enough) ps/2 mouse. I've checked the connectors and they are all fine, though I cannot find any id marks.
The system is like one I've made myself out of spare parts. It's a pentium 233 with 64 meg ram, running Win98. The motherboard uses an intel chipset. I'm not sure if you need any other information, if so, just ask
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by:rid
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See if there is an entry in BIOS setup for the PS/2 port - it just might be disabled. There may also be an IRQ conflict. PS/2 ports usually want IRQ12.

Regards
/RID
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by:rayt333
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Did you check in the CMOS setup to make sure the port is not disabled? sometimes you must "enable" onboard devices before they will work.

Yes I believe this system should work just fine with Win98, the only ones I ever had any trouble with were P60 or P75 (both socket 5 CPU's) and 486's, I have never had any trouble with a P100 or faster
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by:rayt333
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rid
same train of thought?
LOL

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by:drcspy
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lol
you dont remove 'COM' ports from the card......they wont be on the card......they are not physical things, a com port is a combination of irq and memory addy...

you need to start windoze then use keyboard/tab/arrows/enter to get to the control panel/system/device manager......you will find the com ports and lpt ports listed there .........remove them all as per my previous instructions..........
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by:Wouter Boevink
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Didn't you read the question, it's a ps2 card so there's no way enabling or disabling it from the bios. Also the com port discussion has nothing to do with a ps2 card.
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by:raay
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ok, stop fighting plz. Drcspy, I knew what you meant the first time, and it didn't work. And I'm sure I've mentioned nowhere that I'm using a PS/2 card, though I can understand where the confusion might come from. What I meant to convey is that the motherboard supports PS/2, but you have to have an additional plate and plug the socket in manually, the standard mouse for it is serial.

The problem now seemed simple to fix, as it was disabled in the bios, so now the port works. My dilemma now is that in enabling that device, my network card seems to have packed it in. It claims that there is no conflicts, however it is using the same IRQ. I've changed that (from 12 to 5) but it still doesn't work (still says it's working fine however). Is there anyway to get around this, or will I have to choose between a mouse or a network?

Thanks
Raay
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by:drcspy
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wboevink......yep I read the question and responded with knowledge i've gained from my own experiences wiht systems not recognising mouse.......

as for the network card.....i'd suggest uninstall it from device manager, in safe mode, then restart and let windoze sort out the assignments.......
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by:rid
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Depending on BIOS version, there may be an option to dedicate IRQ:s to legacy devices. The PS/2 port might be considered such a device - let it have IRQ12, as that is probably the most common setting for a PS/2 mouse. Also check that BIOS is set for a PnP-aware O/S. Sometimes it is possible to assign IRQ from within windows to PnP devices. See if you can do this with your NIC if the IRQ clash persists.

Regards
/RID
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by:Wouter Boevink
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Ok guys I apologize, didn't want to be rude.
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by:harrlow
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I agree with rid that it's best to assign irq 12 to your ps/2 mouse. As far as i know,Windows does not support plug and play for PS/2 mouse. You will have to install the drivers manually and whatever settings manually. Usually your mouse driver disk will do everything for you.

So, I suggest you remove your network card or its drivers and get your ps/2 mouse set up, shut down, then put the network card back if necesary(if you have taken it out), start the comp, and let Windows's plug-and-play feature handle the rest.
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by:emery800
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It appears that someone installed an adaptor and hooked it up most likely to one of your com ports from what you described. It is not a ps/2 mouse that adaptor that uses IRQ12!!!! You might be able to sneak by with an adaptor as they identified above, however, don't think so. Possibly a bios update may help. What you have is really a serial port (you can confirm by looking where the connection is ties to on motherboard). If you install a real serial mouse then the mouse will work as the system is structured, in my humble opinion (IMHO). :>) Dave
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by:rid
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I beg to point out, respectfully, that the author has stated the following:
"a four pin connector on the motherboard title (funnily enough) ps/2 mouse..."
 This may indeed be a PS/2 port. I've seen these before and they take a PS/2 mouse.

Try harrlow suggestion, but make sure you remove the NIC from device manager (safe mode) as well as physically.

Regards
/RID
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by:raay
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That seems to have fixed any comflicts with the IRQ, but I can't get the network up and running again. The device manager says that it's working fine, and I've run the XP network wizard on both computers without success. Is it because of further complications with the mouse, or something completely new?
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by:harrlow
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are you using win98 or win xp?

Try running winipcfg or ipconfig. Do you have a valid ip address/default gateway there? That should show if you are logged into the network.

have you checked control panel>Network? Is the necessary network card drivers or network protocol set up?
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by:slink9
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Too much confusion ... unsubscribing.
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by:raay
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The puter doesn't even appear to be on the network, though I don't understand why. Everything is set up the same way it was before. Did the network card really enjoy having it's IRQ as 12 and refuses to work on anything else??? I've checked all the cables, run ping and ip config both resulting in not being able to find the other puter
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by:rid
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Most NIC:s come with a diagnostic tool of some kind. Run this and see if your NIC is healthy and that no resources conflicts have arisen. PnP isn't 100% reliable, IMHO. If all is well, remove the NIC and all network functions, in device manager and network applet, then let win detect and reinstall the NIC and networking components. Double-check all settings (protocols, workgroup names etc etc). If the NIC insists on hooking up IRQ12, I'd strongly suggest you disable PnP for the NIC and set it to something else.

Regards
/RID
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by:harrlow
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Some hardware cannot use a particular irq or one of a few irq but they are not so common anymore. You may also want to check your network card's operating manual.
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by:tandy
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Hi,

For the network problem first follow Rid's advice. Find the diognostic program for the NIC.

Check the configuration of the nic. Make sure PNP is
enabled in the setup. Also you can manually set the
IRQ and Memory IO to what windows expects it to be.

If there was a MEMory IO change during pnp(Like when
you added the mouse) the card may have automatically been
Reassigned An IO address by Windows.  Although PNP is
pretty good at avoiding IRQ conflicts it is poor at re-assigning IO addreses. I have had many cases where windows assings an IO to a CArd in memory but the card does not
update its eeprom to relect the changes. MAke sure that the io windows shows for the card is the actual one it is using. If not you can manually re-assign it one from setup.


 What kind of cable are
you using? (Thin ethernet rj45[like telephone] or BNC co-ax
[like cable tv])  I have had lots of trouble with the later
type regarding the connectors.

In the Diagnostic program there will be several types of
tests.  One will check eeprom. If the card is mapped in properly this will show ok. Run the LOOPBACK test. If this
Fails it points to a break in the cable connection some where...

Good Luck

Tandy
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by:rayt333
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Check all installed hardware in Device Manager and see what IRQ they are all using, I would guess something else is sharing IRQ5 with the network card and mostlikely the network card does not like to share.
Usally the soundcard like IRQ 5 but it could be something else also.

You could try removing the network card from the computer and from Device Manager then after a couple of reboots replace the network card and see if it installs it correctly.
Some other things you may want to try is to try a different PCI slot (some slots share the same resources with another one)
Maybe try removing your soundcard and modem and any other device you may have installed. Then see if the network will work OK.
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by:raay
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Ok, I've run the diagnostic program after (eventually) finding the original disk. It took a bit of working out, but I think I fixed the IRQ. It changed it to 4, which I thought would conflict with the com port 1, but nonetheless, that was the only one that would work. When I go back into Windows, however, device manager doesn't even recognise that it's there at all. I figured this must be because the diagnostic is a dos program, so it must have loaded the settings into config.sys or something. Is this correct? Or should Windows still recognise it?
Once again though, the device appears to be working, but I am still unable to access the network. I'm not sure what you mean, Tandy with the eeprom, could you elaborate on that for me plz? I am using the telephone ethernet connection BTW. When I run winipcfg or ipconfig it claims that it can't read ip configuration
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by:harrlow
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You can check/change  the irq setting at Control Panels>System>Device Manager>network adapters....select your network card...then go to rsources.

Also check your control panels>network to see if the drivers are there.

If everything is ok, try using a shorter cable from your network card to your modem. It may just work. I mean the "telephone-like" cable, which is actually called RJ-45.
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by:raay
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The network card isn't even in the device manager, but it is in the network neighbourhood. And the settings look correct there.
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tandy earned 500 total points
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Hi sorry about the 'EEPROM' reference.

It basically stands for Electronically Erasable/Programable
Read only memory( Bit of an oxymoron :).

It basically "IS" the functional part of the Network card
where its data and programs are stored.

The diagnostic program usually provides several test.

One is a test of the basic card or its EEPROM.
If that tests out okay then it usually means the Card
itself is okay.

The loopback test will test the external environment of
the card. If it sends a signal out on a "Closed" circuit
it will get an "Echo" reply which basically says that the physical medium (ie conectors and wires) are in tact with
no breaks. This is a good little test just to make sure there are no broken connection which can happen from
normal wear and tear.

Running the diag program to set IRQ's will not set any
envirnment variable in autoexec.bat or config.sys.
These values are read by the system when the computer
boots.

If your Bios has plug n play enabled it gets the first
"Crack" at the card to configure with the hardware via the
system bus slots. It is the first attemp to avoid irq
conflicts by comparing the "Requested" IRQ set on the card to the rest of the system. If there are conflicts the bios can re-assign the irq of the card.

Some bioses will let you give priorities to a given bus slot. You can force the bios to Make the card IRQ "X" and
thus force re-assignment of the other irq's.

Next windows loads and checks its PnP table to see if there
has been any change. If it detects a change it will run it's own program...Querring devices to see which ones can be re-assigned. If it finds a conflict it will change irq's
as necceary. If it fails to resolve irq's it ideally should show up in device manager with an Exclamation mark.

My experience with Plug n' play has been that it usually
gets it right but when it fails it is many times very difficult to correct.

One simple method to try to get pnp working is to
go to device manager an "remove" some or all of the
devices (ie sound card, Network card, Cd-rom, Com ports).
If you decide to use this method make sure you have the drivers and your windows 98 disk handy. Sometimes this method will give pnp another chance to get it right.

The method I use is to "Install" any missing or
misconfigured devices manually through add new hardware in control panel.

Say for instance the Network Card is not shown in Device Manager.

1)Go Setting..Control Panel...Add New Hardware
  click next and select "No I want to select hardware from
  a list...
"
2)Click Network Adapters Next...Choose "Have Disk"
and point explorer to the driver for the network card
(should be on the disk you got the diagnostic from)

3)Do not reboot when finished Go into device manager
and see if the Network card is now listed...if it is

4)Get properties on card..Select resources..Change settings
Set the card to a known unused IO and IRQ...windows should
provide with a list of available...select the one that matches what you set from the diagnostic program...


Hopefully this will resovle the problem..I have done it many times ...hope it works for you

Good luck,

Tandy






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by:raay
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Thanks Tandy, it works now. I had to change the card to Jumpless mode instead of PnP, and manually make the IRQ 4, which meant disabling Com port 1, but I can live without that.
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by:tandy
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Your welcome Raay,

Glad it worked out for you.

Good tip from Rid to get us going in the right
direction ...

Tandy
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by:emery800
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Great Job All! :>)
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by:rid
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It's threads like this one that makes me spend time here. Nice collaboration, neat solution.

Have a nice weekend, all1

/RID
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by:rid
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... and butterfingers on the shift key
!
/RID
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