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Anyway of downloading from a tape an existing registry to a file for review?

Posted on 2002-07-08
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Last Modified: 2013-12-28
I would kike the ability of reviewing a registry from an old tape without having it write to my hard drive. Is this possible on a HP tape drive?

I have Win 98SE

gonzal13 (Joe)
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Question by:gonzal13
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by:slink9
ID: 7137438
I would think not.  A tape is not readable as-is.  You have to restore anything on it before you can use it.
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Zoplax earned 50 total points
ID: 7138092
Assuming the tape is readable, you should be able to just restore to a different destination; this would restore the USER.DAT and SYSTEM.DAT files to an alternate location.

Then, you could open the REGEDT32 program, and use the Load Hive function to look at and (if necessary) modify the restored registry.  Then, highlight the loaded section and choose Unload Hive to save the changes cleanly.

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Expert Comment

by:slink9
ID: 7138954
Wasn't that what I said????????
I said you don't read it directly from tape, but you have to restore it.
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Author Comment

by:gonzal13
ID: 7138960
Zoplax was more detailed and gave me a push in the right direction. I just never looked at that part of the HP tape drive program.
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