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ntldr missing

Posted on 2002-07-08
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hi,
   whenever i start my comp and choose winxp from lilo, i get this error : 'ntldr missing'.
   i tried replacing ntldr from bootable xp cd. i also tried fixboot , but in vain.
   somebody plz.... help me...asap.

Amol.
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Question by:ammox2000
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11 Comments
 
LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:Crash2100
ID: 7138453
try running the windows xp setup and choose the repair option
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:Comply
ID: 7139106
Did you install recovery Console yet. it would show up at bootup as a choice. If not your only choice is to see if you can do a repair like Crash has said.

 
0
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 7139971
Is this what you have tried.

Start your computer by using the Windows Setup floppy disks or the Windows CD-ROM. At the "Welcome to Setup" screen, press F10 or press R to repair, and start the Windows Recovery Console.

COPY x:\I386\NTLDR C:\

x is your CD drive and if C is not the appropriate drive letter then of course replace C:\ with correct drive letter.

The problem with doing a repair is that it will probably overwrite LILO so you would need to redo LILO if you do a repair.


The Crazy One
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LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 7139999
Also see if this applies to your situation

http://www.experts-exchange.com/osgen/Q_20314954.html
From: Batch  Date: 06/23/2002 05:29AM PST  

Question:

I have installed Linux to dual boot with Windows. My first drive, /dev/hda is Linux, and my second drive is my Windows drive. Windows worked fine until after I installed Linux. Now, when I select "dos" from the LILO: prompt to boot to Windows, all I get is "Starting...." and then my machine locks, up. My entry for Windows in my /etc/lilo.conf file looks like this:

other=/dev/hdb1
       label=dos
       table=/dev/hdb

Why is this happening and how can I work around it?

Answer:

Windows is expecting to be the first disk in your computer and does not know what to do when you try to boot it as the second drive. In order to work around this, you must modify your /etc/lilo.conf file so that the entry for Windows looks like this:

other=/dev/hdb1
       label=dos
       table=/dev/hdb
       map-drive = 0x80
       to = 0x81
       map-drive = 0x81
       to = 0x80

Once you have done this, you must re-run LILO so that your changes take effect. To do this, type /sbin/lilo -v -v.

What this does is fool DOS/Windows into believing that it is the first drive in your system.


I changed my lilo config to

boot=/dev/hda
prompt
timeout=50
message=/boot/message
root=/dev/hdc2

image=/usr/src/linux/arch/i386/boot/bzImage
    label="Linux_Compiled"
    root=/dev/hdc2
    read-only
    optional

other=/dev/hda2
       label=dos
       table=/dev/hda
       map-drive = 0x80
       to = 0x81
       map-drive = 0x81
       to = 0x80
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:ITsheresomewhere
ID: 7148270
ammox2000

Do you understand how it works here?

YOU ask questions - Experts give answers

YOU CLOSE QUESTIONS by Accepting A comment as solving problem.

YOU have asked 6 questions and have NOT closed ONE.

PLEASE go and close your old questions - CLICK on your Profile - upper left see your old questions.

Your mother doesn't work here so pick up after yourself.

ITsheresomewhere
EE Database Volunteer.

0
 

Expert Comment

by:rbarragan
ID: 7159715
"NTLDR Is Missing" Error Message When You Upgrade or Install Windows XP Over Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Millennium Edition

SYMPTOMS
When you attempt to install Windows XP or to upgrade to Windows XP on a computer that runs Microsoft Windows 95, Microsoft Windows 98, or Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me), you may receive the following error message after the first restart during the installation process:

NTLDR is missing
Press any key to restart
This behavior occurs only if Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me is installed on a large-capacity drive that uses the FAT32 file system.



CAUSE
This behavior can occur if your existing Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me installation was cloned and then applied to a drive that has a different geometry from that of the source drive of the cloned copy.

One possible scenario is as follows: You are running Windows 98 on a 4-gigabyte (GB) drive. After you upgrade, for example to a 30-GB hard disk, you use a third-party disk-imaging utility to make a mirror image of your Windows 98 installation and apply the image to the new drive. At a later time, you then upgrade to Windows XP, installing Windows XP over the cloned image of Windows 98.

For this behavior to occur, the following conditions must exist:

The system/boot partition is formatted with the FAT32 file system.


The computer boots by using INT-13 extensions (a partition larger than 7.8 gigabytes with a System-ID type of 0C in the partition table).


Because of the cloning procedure, the Heads (sides) value in the FAT32 BIOS Parameter Block (BPB) does not match the geometry of the physical drive.


The Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me boot code ignores the Heads value in the BPB and starts those programs even though the value is invalid. However, the boot code in Windows 2000 and Windows XP needs this value, and the boot process does not succeed if the value is invalid.



RESOLUTION
To resolve this behavior, correct the invalid Heads (sides) value in the FAT32 BPB to enable the Windows XP boot process to continue. The easiest way to update the field is to rewrite the Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me boot code by using the following procedure:

Restart the computer by using a Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me startup disk that contains the Sys.com file (this file is included by default).


Make a backup copy of the msdos.sys file in the root directory of your system drive. To do this, type the following commands from the command prompt:


attrib -h -r -s c:\msdos.sys
rename msdos.sys *.ysy
At a command prompt, type sys c: . This command rewrites the Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me boot code with accurate BPB information. If this command runs successfully, skip to step 4.

If you are using a Windows Me startup disk and you receive an error message, "Cannot find the system file in the standard locations on drive C:", one or more files in the Windows Me installation have been removed. Use the following steps to place the correct files on the drive so that the sys command can locate them:


Start a command prompt by using the following commands (that is, type the commands and press ENTER after each command):


c:
cd\windows
If Windows is installed in a folder other than the Windows folder, adjust the commands accordingly.


Try to switch to the Command folder by using the following command:
cd command
If an error message indicates that the path is not found, use the following command to create the Command folder, and then run cd command again:


md command
Switch to the EBD folder by using the following command:
cd ebd
If an error message indicates that the path is not found, use the following command to create the EBD folder, and then repeat the cd ebd command:


md ebd
In the EBD folder, use the following commands to copy the Io.sys file from the root of the hard drive and to rename the Io.sys file as Winboot.sys:


attrib -s -h -r c:\io.sys
copy c:\io.sys winboot.sys
Winboot.sys is the file that Sys.com needs.


Switch back to drive A, and then run the following commands:


a:
sys c:
Type the following commands, and press ENTER after each command, to restore the original msdos.sys:
attrib -s -h -r c:\msdos.sys
copy c:\msdos.ysy c:\msdos.sys
Press Y to overwrite the existing MSDOS.SYS file. You should receive a "1 FILE(S) COPIED" verification that the file was overwritten.


Restart the computer to Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me, and then try the Windows XP installation or upgrade procedure again.

NOTE : Alternatively, after you run the sys c: command, you can boot to the Recovery Console, and then use the fixboot command to rewrite the Windows XP boot code. This procedure enables the original installation to proceed typically.




0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:haydes007
ID: 7483570
I believe fixmbr is the command you wanted.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:slateblu
ID: 7863650
No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this TA.
I will leave a recommendation in the Cleanup topic area that this question is:

- no feedback from poster - need expert feedback
- Place in PAQ

Please leave any comments here within the
next seven days.

PLEASE DO NOT ACCEPT THIS COMMENT AS AN ANSWER!

Warm Regards

SB
0
 

Expert Comment

by:rbarragan
ID: 7887513
SYMPTOMS
When you attempt to install Windows XP or to upgrade to Windows XP on a computer that runs Microsoft Windows 95, Microsoft Windows 98, or Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me), you may receive the following error message after the first restart during the installation process:

NTLDR is missing
Press any key to restart
This behavior occurs only if Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me is installed on a large-capacity drive that uses the FAT32 file system.
CAUSE
This behavior can occur if your existing Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me installation was cloned and then applied to a drive that has a different geometry from that of the source drive of the cloned copy.

One possible scenario is as follows: You are running Windows 98 on a 4-gigabyte (GB) drive. After you upgrade, for example to a 30-GB hard disk, you use a third-party disk-imaging utility to make a mirror image of your Windows 98 installation and apply the image to the new drive. At a later time, you then upgrade to Windows XP, installing Windows XP over the cloned image of Windows 98.

For this behavior to occur, the following conditions must exist:
The system/boot partition is formatted with the FAT32 file system.
The computer boots by using INT-13 extensions (a partition larger than 7.8 gigabytes with a System-ID type of 0C in the partition table).
Because of the cloning procedure, the Heads (sides) value in the FAT32 BIOS Parameter Block (BPB) does not match the geometry of the physical drive.
The Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me boot code ignores the Heads value in the BPB and starts those programs even though the value is invalid. However, the boot code in Windows 2000 and Windows XP needs this value, and the boot process does not succeed if the value is invalid.
RESOLUTION
To resolve this behavior, correct the invalid Heads (sides) value in the FAT32 BPB to enable the Windows XP boot process to continue. The easiest way to update the field is to rewrite the Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me boot code by using the following procedure:
Restart the computer by using a Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me startup disk that contains the Sys.com file (this file is included by default).
Make a backup copy of the msdos.sys file in the root directory of your system drive. To do this, type the following commands from the command prompt:
attrib -h -r -s c:\msdos.sys
rename msdos.sys *.ysy

At a command prompt, type sys c:. This command rewrites the Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me boot code with accurate BPB information. If this command runs successfully, skip to step 4.

If you are using a Windows Me startup disk and you receive an error message, "Cannot find the system file in the standard locations on drive C:", one or more files in the Windows Me installation have been removed. Use the following steps to place the correct files on the drive so that the sys command can locate them:
Start a command prompt by using the following commands (that is, type the commands and press ENTER after each command):
c:
cd\windows

If Windows is installed in a folder other than the Windows folder, adjust the commands accordingly.


Try to switch to the Command folder by using the following command:
cd command

If an error message indicates that the path is not found, use the following command to create the Command folder, and then run cd command again:
md command

Switch to the EBD folder by using the following command:
cd ebd

If an error message indicates that the path is not found, use the following command to create the EBD folder, and then repeat the cd ebd command:
md ebd

In the EBD folder, use the following commands to copy the Io.sys file from the root of the hard drive and to rename the Io.sys file as Winboot.sys:
attrib -s -h -r c:\io.sys
copy c:\io.sys winboot.sys

Winboot.sys is the file that Sys.com needs.


Switch back to drive A, and then run the following commands:
a:
sys c:

Type the following commands, and press ENTER after each command, to restore the original msdos.sys:
attrib -s -h -r c:\msdos.sys
copy c:\msdos.ysy c:\msdos.sys

Press Y to overwrite the existing MSDOS.SYS file. You should receive a "1 FILE(S) COPIED" verification that the file was overwritten.


Restart the computer to Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me, and then try the Windows XP installation or upgrade procedure again.

NOTE: Alternatively, after you run the sys c: command, you can boot to the Recovery Console, and then use the fixboot command to rewrite the Windows XP boot code. This procedure enables the original installation to proceed typically.
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LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 7887590
rbarragan

Was it necessary to repost a comment a rather lengthy one at that. This isn't going to get you any points any more so then the first time you posted the comment. Geesh
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modulo earned 0 total points
ID: 7956796
PAQ'd and points removed

modulo

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