Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 816
  • Last Modified:

Mapping a network drive sub-directory

Hi All

I am trying to map a network drive to a local drive letter. The problem is that I want to map a sub-directory and windows 98 only allows me to map to the top level. On windows 2000 I can quite happily map something like

\\ntserver3\docs\folder1\subfolder

to a drive letter.

However if I try the above on windows 98 it is purley mapped to \\ntserver3

Does anyone know how I can achieve my goal on windows 98?

Many thanks

Steve
0
spwiggins
Asked:
spwiggins
  • 11
  • 6
  • 4
  • +5
1 Solution
 
Wouter BoevinkMasterCommented:
It's not possible on windows '98 or you'll have to share the subfolder.
0
 
1cellCommented:
exaclty, each sub folder in the path would have to allow at least read permissions.
0
 
AjninCommented:
Novell lets you do this
0
Concerto Cloud for Software Providers & ISVs

Can Concerto Cloud Services help you focus on evolving your application offerings, while delivering the best cloud experience to your customers? From DevOps to revenue models and customer support, the answer is yes!

Learn how Concerto can help you.

 
1cellCommented:
yeah, so change network operating systems ;-)
0
 
stevewigginsCommented:
If windows 98 can't do it natively does anyone know if there are the any utilities available that allow it?

Cheers

Steve
0
 
HJohnsonCommented:
0
 
Hyper8Commented:
Here is an easier way. Lets say you want to map a drive to D: or D:\Test. Open up a DOS window. I use this all the time on all Windows OS's.

subst Z: D:\
or
subst Z: D:\test
0
 
AjninCommented:
Subst will work as long as the drive letter is E: or lower. Windows considers anything higher to be network drives and it won't let you use the subst command on network drives. There probably a way to change this.
0
 
HJohnsonCommented:
DOS????   BAHAHAAHAHAHAHHAHAHAH!!!!
0
 
HJohnsonCommented:
(seriously though, I'm an old DOS user from waaayyyy back)
0
 
stevewigginsCommented:
Hi All

Thanks for all your comments, however I think we have gone off track a bit.

I don't need to share folders on my local drive...I need to map a drive letter on my system to a sub-directory of a networked drive. Please see my original posting for an example.

Earlier answers suggest this cannot be done, but can any add on utilities achieve it? (as it is possible in W2K)

Many thanks

Steve
0
 
HJohnsonCommented:
I've answered it with my posting - please review the link to the microsoft article.  I've done this with my network.

http://topcc.org/articles/pdfdocs/sharing.pdf

thnx
0
 
HJohnsonCommented:
I've answered it with my posting - please review the link to the microsoft article.  I've done this with my network.

http://topcc.org/articles/pdfdocs/sharing.pdf

thnx
0
 
stevewigginsCommented:
HJohnson

I have reviewed your article again. This does not address my original posting. I know how to share a sub-directory under windows 98, I also know how to map that share to a drive letter on a different computer. What I am unable to to is to map a 'sub-directory of the share' to a drive letter on a different computer.

Regards

Steve
0
 
HJohnsonCommented:
well, I'm not sure I understand what you are getting at then - you just create a new share name with the mapping (you can have multiple shares and "sub-shares") and just map a drive letter to the new share...??    Doesn't this accomplish what you are trying to do? (unless your are trying to map to directories that keep changing names?)
Just flip your logic around and this will work for you.  (unless I'm totally missing what you're trying to do)


0
 
stevewigginsCommented:
HJohnson

Let me explain the scenario and it may help you understand my problem. We have a server with a departmental share where all of our QA documents are stored. Under this shared directory are hundreds of sub-directorys.

On our windows 98 workstations we need to open up various sub-directorys from within an old program, unfortunately using the departmental share results in a path name that is too long for it to handle...it would be something like

\\serverX\R&D\QA Documents\Products\Cable Counter\Hardware\Rev A\

but much longer with many more depths!

Therefore I wish too temporarily map a required products sub-directory on the server to a local drive letter on my windows 98 workstation to reduce the path length. As I said earlier there are hundreds of sub-directorys under the products directory on the server so it would be totally impracticle to share each one from the server. Hence my original posting.

Hope this makes it clearer

Regards

Steve
0
 
AjninCommented:
Who asked this question spwiggins or stevewiggins?
0
 
stevewigginsCommented:
SPWiggins/SteveWiggins

It the same person....me ;-)

Ones my work account...the other my home account.

Steve
0
 
AjninCommented:
Your only allowed one account. No such thing as a work and home account. Read EE's policies.

Anyway I know of no way of doing this besides doing something like the SUBST command. Other than that there might be some third party utilities.
0
 
HJohnsonCommented:
ahhh. OK.    This looks like what you are looking for then.

http://www.ccg-1.net/virtualdisk.htm

0
 
HJohnsonCommented:
0
 
stevewigginsCommented:
Hi HJohnson

Glad that I have now managed to explain my problem clearly.

Tried your first link and am unable to download file.....dodgy website!

Second link I managed to download OK...but this program will not do the job required. if you try to map to a path such as \\serverx\xxx\yyy it comes back with an error message.

Regards

Steve
0
 
HJohnsonCommented:
Sorry, that's as much as I can do... keep trying the website, I guess.  Good luck.

Try searching the internet for more of these "Virtual Net Drive"'s.  

0
 
HJohnsonCommented:
Here's another one I found - for win95/98 only.  Acts as a plug in to windows explorer.

http://www.simtel.net/pub/pd/9670.html


0
 
Kyle SchroederEndpoint EngineerCommented:
This is a limitation of WIn98's network mapping system, there is no way to work around it because at the root, you're still mapping a drive letter and using Win98's network services.

Sorry.

-dog*
0
 
HJohnsonCommented:
That's not true - the last link I provided is a third party product that allows you to map - I tried it in win98se and it works great!
0
 
Computer101Commented:
Hello all,
I am Computer101 from Experts-Exchange and also an expert within this topic area. This question has been open a long time.  What I am going to do is allow feedback from the questioner and xperts.  If it is not resolved, I will delete or accept an answer based on the info I have been given, Experts, feel free to offer input.  I will monitor these questions for a period of 5-7 days and come back and evaluate.  I will have another moderator (who is also an expert in this topic area) look at the question also to ensure we do the right thing for this question.

Thank you
Computer101
E-E Admin
0
 
Kyle SchroederEndpoint EngineerCommented:
It appears HJohnson's solution works...

-dog*
0
 
Computer101Commented:
Comment from expert accepted as answer

Computer101
E-E Admin
0

Featured Post

Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

  • 11
  • 6
  • 4
  • +5
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now