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Upgrading RedHat 6.0 -> 7.2: /usr too small

Posted on 2002-07-15
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I want to upgrade from RedHat 6.0 to 7.2, but it appears that my /usr is about 700 MB too small.

Is there a way to extend /usr without reformatting the whole disk?

My computer is a dual-boot Linux/Windows, and about 6 GB are occupied by FAT partitions. I am ready to sacrifice the Windows option and to reformat the FAT partitions to Linux. But would I be able to add that space to an existing /usr partition?
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Question by:karnovsk
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by:jlevie
ID: 7156927
You can't add space to the existing file system that /usr is occupying, but you could make a new file system out of part of the space that windows is using and move the contents of /usr there. Then change the mount point for /usr to the new partition and you'd have the space you need.
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by:karnovsk
ID: 7157007
Thank you. How do I do it?
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jlevie earned 450 total points
ID: 7161000
The process goes something like this:

1) Using your favorite partition tool (fdisk, parted, Partition Magic, etc) create a Linux partition of whatever size desired out of the space windows is using. You can use 'fdisk -l /dev/hda' to see what the device node name for the new partition is, e.g. hda6, hda7, etc.

2) From Linux make a file system on the new partition with mkfs (e.g., mkfs /dev/hda7).

3) Mount the "new /usr" FS on a temporary mount point and copy the existing /usr contents to the new file system, like:

   # mount /dev/hda7 /mnt
   # cd /mnt
   # dump 0af - /usr | restore rvf -

4) Then edit /etc/fstab to reflect where /usr has moved to and boot the box.

It is best to do moving of the data in single user mode, or even better from a boot off of one of the floppy or CD bootable 'tiny' Linux packages.
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Author Comment

by:karnovsk
ID: 7161284
Thank you. Actually, I have already done using GNU Parted.
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