ICS simple question

I would like to set up ICS on my Win2k professional machine.  This does not seem too difficult.  I would also like to have a linux box behind this one, able to access the internet through the Win2k professional box.  Is this possible?  It seems as though it would be.  I am just not sure if you could have a "non-windows" machine on the "client" end of ICS.  Thanks for the help.
barthalamuAsked:
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pjknibbsCommented:
jmiller47: I'm not sure the bit about Linux not working over ICS is true. As far as I know, the Internet Connection Sharing service essentially acts as a combined DHCP server and Internet gateway, so any machine which understands the concept of DHCP and default gateways should work through it.

In fact, I just found a Microsoft Knowledge Base article (Q310563) describing ICS in Windows XP which includes the following text:

Any IP-attached device can connect, including older Windows-based clients, non-Windows-based clients, Microsoft Windows 98-based clients, Microsoft Windows 2000-based clients, and Microsoft Windows XP-based clients with no additional client software required.
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Joel MillerDevOps EngineerCommented:
That is easy. Just use the wizard to set it up. It's very self-explanatory. If you have questions while going through it, just post there.

I do not think however that a Linux box will be able to be an ICS client. They have a pretty proprietary client. However, someone here may be able to find an alternative way.

I would however, think of the possiblity of using a Linksys router to share your Internet connection if you have Broadband. If you have dialup, this may not work for you, but a Linksys Router would be a much better choice for routing your internet traffic and has a built-in firewall and many other features. It is also a lot more secure and stable than Windows 2000 ICS.

One last thought, I believe that if you set up a Windows 2000 Server and enable Routing and Remote Access you could use a Linux client...

I hope this helps
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pjknibbsCommented:
Oh, and the same article but for Windows 2000 and 98SE (Q234815) contains the same bullet point.
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Joel MillerDevOps EngineerCommented:
That is good news. I knew that the client was kind of proprietary, but if they use a regular DHCP, DNS server, and gateway, then a Linux box should be able to connect. My only additional concern is whether Linux can accept DHCP addresses. I am not positive on that. It might, but I would want to be more sure of it first...
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pjknibbsCommented:
I'm sure Linux can be assigned DHCP addresses--it can certainly dish them out! I don't know how you'd actually configure the box for it to do this, however.
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Joel MillerDevOps EngineerCommented:
pjknibbs - You are correct. I started thinking a bit more about it and it is WINS, not DHCP that Linux cannot use. If, in fact ICS uses standard DHCP, Gateway, and DNS servers, then a Linux clint should theoretically work just fine.

I still highly recommend a Linksys router though if Broadband is used. It not only offers more security, ease of use, and features, but also in a situation as discussed above, you would need to always have the Windows 2000 computer up and running (and working) for Internet access to work. This can be a problem for some people. (Especially keeping the Windows 2000 box working all the time...) :)
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barthalamuAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your help.  All set up.
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