[2 days left] What’s wrong with your cloud strategy? Learn why multicloud solutions matter with Nimble Storage.Register Now

x
?
Solved

Memory optimization

Posted on 2002-07-18
3
Medium Priority
?
230 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-01
This may seem like an "obvious" or "beginner" question, but I've had no formal training in C++ programming, and I can't find any good information about this particular topic.

I create two classes, ie:  A Person class and a Car Class.
Each person will own two cars.
The car class will have a very small number of member variables (2 or 3), but a large number of functions (20 or 30).
There will be a large number of Person classes created at one time during the program, so there will be twice as many car classes created (2 for each person).

My question is:  How can I determine the memory footprint (not necessarily exactly, but generally) that is going to be taken up by each car class.  If it is going to be heavy because of all the functions, I want to find a different way of going about the whole process.
0
Comment
Question by:dirtdart
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 2
3 Comments
 
LVL 86

Accepted Solution

by:
jkr earned 800 total points
ID: 7163331
The functions (or better: methods) actuallydon't really contribute to the size, as they are stored only once. The "memory footprint" pretty much is determined by the data (member variables) that are stored. To find out about that, use

size_t sz = sizeof ( <datatype>);

The 'sizeof()' operator returns the size, in bytes, of any datatype or class.
0
 
LVL 5

Author Comment

by:dirtdart
ID: 7163336
Well that was quick and painless!  And believe it or not, exactly what I wanted to hear.  I was afraid that the methods would dramatically increase the size of the class, and in this case a large class taking up a lot of memory would be totally unacceptable.

Thanks
0
 
LVL 5

Author Comment

by:dirtdart
ID: 7163337
Well that was quick and painless!  And believe it or not, exactly what I wanted to hear.  I was afraid that the methods would dramatically increase the size of the class, and in this case a large class taking up a lot of memory would be totally unacceptable.

Thanks
0

Featured Post

Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Written by John Humphreys C++ Threading and the POSIX Library This article will cover the basic information that you need to know in order to make use of the POSIX threading library available for C and C++ on UNIX and most Linux systems.   [s…
Container Orchestration platforms empower organizations to scale their apps at an exceptional rate. This is the reason numerous innovation-driven companies are moving apps to an appropriated datacenter wide platform that empowers them to scale at a …
The viewer will learn how to clear a vector as well as how to detect empty vectors in C++.
The viewer will be introduced to the member functions push_back and pop_back of the vector class. The video will teach the difference between the two as well as how to use each one along with its functionality.

649 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question