Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

2nd sco hard-drive

Posted on 2002-07-20
2
Medium Priority
?
302 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-05
I have a sco unix 5.0.5 disk.  I'm having trouble with the kernal on this disk, indeed I think fsck has advised removal of some important files.
This is what I want to do:
I have a working unix system, I want to add the poor drive as a second filesytem to the good system, and hopefully read the data off the poor drive to the good one. The reason for this is I cannot add a nic on the poor drive kernal.
Is this possible, I see the main problem being that my good system is /usr and the poor drive is also /usr ???
If this is not possible can I lap-link unix to unix
and do a uucp copy, using the serial ports.
Cheers.
0
Comment
Question by:bluez
2 Comments
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
dkloes earned 300 total points
ID: 7166900
When you mount the old drive, do not mount it as /usr - mount it to some other mount point.  Then, assuming the 1st drive is installed as the boot drive with all of the OS on it, you can simply copy files from the whatever the mount point is for the old drive.
0
 

Author Comment

by:bluez
ID: 7172128
Thanks for your help
0

Featured Post

Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

FreeBSD on EC2 FreeBSD (https://www.freebsd.org) is a robust Unix-like operating system that has been around for many years. FreeBSD is available on Amazon EC2 through Amazon Machine Images (AMIs) provided by FreeBSD developer and security office…
Why Shell Scripting? Shell scripting is a powerful method of accessing UNIX systems and it is very flexible. Shell scripts are required when we want to execute a sequence of commands in Unix flavored operating systems. “Shell” is the command line i…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

824 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question