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Poor 802.11 reception

Posted on 2002-07-27
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Last Modified: 2013-12-09
I have my NetGear MR314 in one of the bedrooms, but the reception is spotty in other rooms in the house. In some spots it is completely dead. I have experimented and moved the MR314 all around to different locations and sometimes it helps fix one dead zone but causes another.

What can I do. What type of obstructions interfere with the signal the most? Cork boards? Electrical wires in the walls? Stereo equiptment. If I know what is most likely to block the signal, I can maybe come up with some solutions.

Also, what about repeaters? Is there such a thing as a cheep 802.11 repeater? Are there any compatibility issues?
thanks
Mike
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Question by:mmoore
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Accepted Solution

by:
vert earned 100 total points
ID: 7199009
The denser and more electrically conductive the object the more it will block the signal.  Steel blocks it more than plastic, wood comes somewhere in the middle.

Another problem with this could be mutlipath degradation due to reflections from nearby objects at either end of the link.

I'm not familiar with netgear but if its a diversity system (ie, two antennas each end) then you could try putting more distance between the antennas if they're detachable.

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by:mmoore
ID: 7199126
Vert,
Netgear has a little non removable antenna at mounted to the box on a swivle. The receiving antenna is in a laptop computer, so I don't think there is much I can do about the antenna's. Thanks for the answer.
It looks like the best that I can do is to make it easy to move the transmitter (router) around to different locations in the room so that when my wife moves, I can move the transmitter to accomidate her.
Mike
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Expert Comment

by:liloXwin
ID: 7299732
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Expert Comment

by:Ruprex
ID: 7887147
If the AP supports Wireless AP (WLAP) you could purchase another AP and set the two for WLAP.  This would make the new AP a repeater.  The new AP would need to be in range of the first AP as it will not be wired to the network.  It will connect to the first AP via RF, just as your PCMCIA card does now but it would also accept your PCMCIA's transmission, passing it off to the wired AP and back to your LAN.  Again, this will only work with AP's that support WLAP.
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