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Configuring a router for ADSL connection sharing

Posted on 2002-07-29
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http://www.experts-exchange.com/jsp/qManageQuestion.jsp?qid=20329568

I'd prefer a linux based solution but if it can be done from windows it might be ok as well..

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Question by:glebspy
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by:rid
ID: 7185905
One would think a commercial router should come with a manual. Doesn't it describe the setup procedure?

Some routers have a web-based interface for running setup. You can get at the settings by connecting to the router using a web browser. You do need the IP address of the router. The client (one of your laptops) needs to have a working TCP/IP setup, I guess.

There are also those routers that use telnet, I've heard. You would still need the IP address.

Either of the above procedures should work well in a Linux environment.

Regards
/RID
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by:jmiller47
ID: 7186178
What model of Router did you buy? We can't give you instructions on how to configure something if we don't know what it is. I could try... But I would probably make a mess of it :-)
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by:glebspy
ID: 7186545
I am using pppoe and I dont have a static IP address. The router is a CG-BARSW4P (Corega Broadband Access Router 4P) and specifically says it's compatible with Linux/Unix and with pppoe. Sorry I didn't provide this info.
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by:jmiller47
ID: 7186817
Well, with that router, I don't think I could help you too much unfortunately. I really have never even heard of that one before. If I may ask, what was you main reason for going with that brand??

If you still have the ability to, I would recommend trading in that router for a Linksys BEFSR41 4 port router.

You can find them for approximately $65.00 and they are the easiest to set up and to get them to do whatever you want with an easy web-based setup... I definitely works easy with PPOE and Unix or any operating system.

http://www.pricegrabber.com/search_getprod.php?masterid=220898&ut=4403c766a48baa3b&found=2&search=befsr41
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by:glebspy
ID: 7186852
If I may ask, what was you
                       main reason for going with that brand??

I live in Japan, and the router is a Japanese make. This is why I am reluctant to try to read the manual.

In any case, if there is no generic way of setting up routers from the operating system, perhaps you can tell me at least some general principles which might help.  For instance, rid says that I need the "IP address of the router". What does this mean .. even my computers don't have static IP addresses, so how the router possibly have a static IP address? Surely you are not telling me that a router will not work with a dynamically assigned IP address.. other experts have confirmed that a router will work under such conditions.

rid also says, "some routers have a web-based interface for running setup". But if I have not set up the router yet, how can I use it to connect to the web to set it up? Or do you mean, connect to the web *without* the router, download something and then plug in the router and run .. in this case, what is the something for Mandrake 8.2? Also, when I plug in the router to set it up, should it be fully connected to the web via the adsl modem, or only connected to the computer on which I'm running the install software? If you can't give me generic answers at least describe exactly the procedures you used with your own routers.

Thank you
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by:jmiller47
ID: 7186872
"some routers have a web-based interface for running setup".

Web based does not mean that you need an Internet connection to proceed. It only means that the setup is a bunch of web pages that are accessed through HTTP over TCP/IP. Basically, the router is also a mini web server. If you know the LAN IP address that comes with the router, you can connect to the router and configure it using a web browser.

Connect the Router to the ADSL modem.

Connect your computer to the LAN port of the router.

Set up your computer's network card to use DHCP.

Open a web browser and type in the address: http://192.168.1.1

The web interface should come up to let you configure it.

Past that, you will need to read the book for the specific situation. If that does not work, you will need to also read the book...

Sorry..
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by:glebspy
ID: 7186935
Are you saying that all routers come with a static IP address, and that when I bought a router, I also bought myself an IP address?

Other question: are you saying that if I set things up as you suggested, I don't have to log in to my broadband provider?

The address you gave me just hangs. Was I supposed to take it literally, or rather substitute some address which is specific to my equipment/connection?

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jmiller47 earned 500 total points
ID: 7187139
The internet has a large amount of addresses. There are certain ranges of address although that are not allowed to be used or sold for Internet use.

These addresses are used in home networks. The most common small network IP addresses are 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254. These are reserved for people who want a network seperate of (but connected to) the Internet. NAT (from a router) allows the two networks (your LAN and the Internet) to translate addresses. These groups of addresses are commonly referred to as "Private addresses". The normal addresses used on the Internet are commonly referred to as "Public addresses".

A router in a LAN is usually set up as 192.168.1.1 on the LAN interface, but as you stated earlier, the WAN interface is connected to the Internet. Even though the LAN Interface (connected to your internal network) may have an address like 192.168.1.1, the WAN address (connected to the Internet) may have a DHCP assigned address or a Static IP address provided by your ISP (Internet Service Provider).

You may also have an internal DHCP server assign an address to your Router. The manufacturer determines if this is the default and if it can be changed. The most common procedure is to give it a static address as the Router in a home network is usually also set up as the DHCP server.

To make sure that you can easily administer the router, many manufacturers now build in a web server to allow you to administer and configure the router through a web browser by only typing in the IP address and a password.

Some manufacturers only allow you to telnet into the device, or use a serial connection, or possibly some other means to configure it... The most common defaults are listed above, but it is really  up to the manufacturer.

The answers to your questions:

"Are you saying that all routers come with a static IP address, and that when I bought a router, I also bought myself an IP address?"
-As stated above, the router may have had a static IP address assigned to the LAN port. This is a private address and not used on the Internet so there is no need to purchase it.


"Other question: are you saying that if I set things up as you suggested, I don't have to log in to my broadband provider?"
-You will still need to log in to your broadband provider. You would do this through the administrative utility of your router. Most routers allow you to do this through a simple web-based utility as mentioned above. Unfortunately, it sounds like your router is not so easy to set up.

"The address you gave me just hangs. Was I supposed to take it literally, or rather substitute some address which is specific to my equipment/connection?"
Yes, you can also try http://192.168.1.0 or http://10.0.0.1

Those are the only recommendations that I can make. Maybe there is someone who can translate enough of the instructions to make sense of things.
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Expert Comment

by:jmiller47
ID: 7187144
I'm sorry the first alternate address to try should have been http://192.168.0.1 . I reversed the last two octets.
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by:glebspy
ID: 7187190
That was a great answer. I understand so much better now. I think you deserve the points. Please permit me to leave the question open just a little while longer until I have time to try everything which arises from the discussion.

I have one further question:


Your recipe for configuring the router was as follows -
Connect the Router to the ADSL modem.

                       Connect your computer to the LAN port of the router.

                       Set up your computer's network card to use DHCP.

                       Open a web browser and type in the address: http://192.168.1.1

                       The web interface should come up to let you configure it.

However am I right in thinking that, because the router acts as its own web server, it might not even be necessary to perform step 1 (connecting the router to the adsl modem/outside world) as long as one is just interested in
*configuring* it? If that's wrong, could you explain why the router still needs to see the internet..?

Thank you
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by:jmiller47
ID: 7188629
Your last statement is correct. You can configure the router without being connected to the Internet. Actually it is fine to never connect to the Internet and just use the router as a a means to communicate from one computer to another in your LAN.

I am fine with answering any additional questions you may have on this, but please try to wait 1 or two days before commenting again. I am not getting any e-mail notifications of comments over the last few days. My web host has my e-mail all screwed up and I hoep to have it fixed today or tomorrow. I have to manually go around and check every section and question in Experts Exchange instead of getting notified!

Thanks!
Joel
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by:jmiller47
ID: 7188776
I seem to have e-mail back. I hoep you have have all your questions answered!
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by:glebspy
ID: 7188840
Thank you very much for your extremely clear explanation, and thanks to others who xontributed as well.

Just one last thing .. where on my machine can I find what the addresses are of all the other machines connected to the lan at a given time (from windows or linux or both)? i.e. whats the basic access point to foreign file systems from the desktop?
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Expert Comment

by:jmiller47
ID: 7188870
What would you like to access? If you are looking to only find the IP addresses of the machines located ont he network, use the router web interface and click on DHCP> DHCP table. It will give you a list of all the computers in the LAN and the IP addresses they were given.
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by:glebspy
ID: 7188986
and what about file systems.. I guess ftp is required, and I can't just click on some folder to bring up the file system on another computer on the lan. .?

Also, am I more or less secure than I was before I started using a router?
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by:glebspy
ID: 7188987
and what about file systems.. I guess ftp is required, and I can't just click on some folder to bring up the file system on another computer on the lan. .?

Also, am I more or less secure than I was before I started using a router?
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