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What is the diffrence betwen a Celeron and a Pentium 4?

Posted on 2002-07-29
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Whut is the diferince betwen a Celeron and a Pentium 4 prosessor?
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Question by:dab611
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by:Wakeup
ID: 7187146
dab611,

There are many differences between the two processors.
Here is something that contrasts Celeron's and Pentium series of chips.  
http://www.fit.edu/writ/toolkit/hardware/chipsets.htm

The celeron is comparable to the AMD's Duron.  As the AMD Athlon XP is compared to Pentium 4.  To put in a more every day life situation, you can say the Celeron is like a Honda Civic.  And a Pentium 3 is like a Honda Accord, and a Pentium 4 is like an Acura.  Etc.  If that makes any sense?!


Here are some more links:
http://www.gen-x-pc.com/pentium_4_celerons.htm
http://www.cpuscorecard.com/bench_ip3.htm
http://www.bestpricecomputers.ltd.uk/products/intel_info.htm
http://www.pc4d.com/hardware/98/intel_celeron_at_900_and_850_mhz_processors_follow_the_penti.shtml
http://sci.newsfactor.com/perl/story/16514.html
http://www.dooyoo.co.uk/review/261945.html
http://www.pcclub.com/forum/messageview.cfm?catid=27&threadid=2994

An response from a question asked in the above forum might prove to tell you the differences:
The Celeron chip doesn't use floating point technology, and can only make simple mathematic computations. It hands off the scientific computations to the software, which can greatly slow response time. However, the main purpose of the Celeron chip is to support database and text programs that are primarily used by small businesses that have no need for high-level, high-performance software. If you are into gaming or 3D animation or video editing etc, as many people are, the P4 processor would be more suited to your taste, as it can handle floating point calculations by itself at high speeds.

As far as L2 cache and bus speed, I'm not sure. I would assume that they're the same, but don't quote me on that.

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by:pjknibbs
ID: 7187242
I have to totally disagree with Wakeup when he says the Celeron has no built-in floating point technology--the last Intel processor which shipped without a floating-point unit was the 486SX; the Celeron most certainly has one!

The real problem is also that there are several types of Celeron. The FCPGA Socket 370 Celeron is basically a Pentium III with half its L2 cache disabled and some other performance-degrading tweaks, such as a slower FSB (the fastest FCPGA Celerons ran on a 100MHz FSB, as opposed to 133MHz for the P3). There is also a newer variant of the Celeron which is basically an older model Pentium 4--any Celeron running at 1.6GHz or higher is one of these.
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by:frache
ID: 7187257
Agree with Pjknibbs.
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by:frache
ID: 7187259
You can find a lot of information about processor here :
www.tomshardware.com
section : processor
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by:mattjsimps
ID: 7187306
The main difference between the two is cache. Cache (for those of you who dont know), is high speed memory situated close to or on the cpu chip. Cache memory is very fast, but therefore expensive.

As the celeron is the budget version of the pentium, it has less cache, typically half that of the equivlent pentium. this reduces the cost, but slows it down (note i mean actual performance, not pure clock speed. This only really matters if you are using more memory intensive tasks.

I too have to agree about the floating point. it is there. it is the lack of cahce that slows intensive mathematics down as it is more likely to need to access main memory, which is a real time consumer. It is roughly the same ratio as accessing disk instead of RAM.
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by:slink9
ID: 7187627
Okay.  The simplest and most straightforward answer is SPEED.  If you compare a Pentium to a Celeron side by side the Pentium will generally blow the Celeron away because of the lower caching.  I had a Celeron 400 in my laptop and absolutely hated it.  Another processor comparable to the Celeron is the Duron.  Stay away from both of these.
By the way, I had rather compare the P4/Athlon to a Porsche and the Celeron/Duron to a VW.
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cesar44 earned 50 total points
ID: 7188127
dab611:

Consider Celeron a crippled version of Pentium 3 processor line, with less Level 2 cache (128KB) and slower FSB (100MHz). Its floating-point units are way slower than Pentium 4 and executes less instructions in paralel.

Cesar
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by:dab611
ID: 7188493
Thanks you, u got strait forward, & to the important stuff. It helped. thanx.
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by:slink9
ID: 7188570
Interesting.  Knock dab611 off my list of people to help.  There were many more detailed and explanatory answers than that yet you basically just accepted the last comment that summarized all of the others.  Mine was even simpler than that, but I never expected it to be accepted.
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by:frache
ID: 7188677
Curious ... But dab611 is new ...
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by:pjknibbs
ID: 7189910
The comment he accepted was also factually wrong--as I said in my comment, Intel have started releasing processors under the Celeron brand which are crippled Pentium 4s, not crippled Pentium 3s.
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by:slink9
ID: 7190162
Did your comment even get read?  Probably not since the last comment posted was the one accepted.
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by:cesar44
ID: 7192198
pjknibbs:

Thank you for your remark. Actually, as Intel released in last May the new Celeron 1.7GHz, I can't tell no more than this is a crippled Pentium 3: it's really a crippled 2nd generation Pentium 4 in its own right. It still has less Level-2 cache  and its FSB runs at 100MHz quad-pumped to 400MHz, using the old Willamette core that Intel dumped for the new Northwood core in the beginning of this year.

Cesar
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