Is there a linux version that can run under windows

Axter
Axter used Ask the Experts™
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Is there a linux version that can run under Windows platform?
If so, please provide a download link.

Thanks
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yup, I think WinLinux200x does.

http://www.winlinux.net/
WinLinux was the first distribution of Linux for Windows. It runs in Windows so you can try Linux out without re-partitioning your harddrive.

Author

Commented:
I've had no luck installing Linux on any of my computers, so I don't want to pay for this program, and find out I can't get it to work either.

So I'm looking for a free version, or something that at least has a trial version.
mmm... another solution is to install vmware ( http://www.vmware.com ), you can evaluate this software for 30 days.

VMWare is a Virtual Machine Software, it "creates" a virtual computer inside your running Operating System ( Windows or Linux), then, you can install any OS inside this new computer, and most of the linux distributions can be downloaded for free.

This method is somewhat slower than a full instalation, because you will be running 2 full operating systems on the same computer, but it works very good if you have a fast machine and a good amount of RAM.

I used it to run windows from within linux (slackware) on a Celeron 466Mhz, and it wasn't that bad.

Hope this helps, regards.
-Garisoain
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Author

Commented:
I'm sorry, but I don't understand the purpose of the VMWARE.
I tried reading the web site, and it does a poor job of describing their product.

What's the full purpose of VMWare, and exactly what does it do?
VMWare *creates* another computer INSIDE yours (includes a virtual BIOS, Video Card, Hard Disk, Network Interface, etc).

It runs on a window, so you don't need to reboot or exit your current OS to boot the new computer.

Then, as with any new computer, you can install any OS that you want, (eg. Linux, windows, BeOS, etc.), this way you can have Linux or any other OS running on a window.

It's pretty well documented, go to the download section on www.vmware.com, and look for "Evaluate VMware Workstation".

Note: Install a new OS on top of another requires a certain amount of knowledge about hardware and operating systems.

Author

Commented:
Well, that still doesn't help me, because I've already tried to install other Linux versions on my computer, and I had no luck.  I even added a clean non-ATA hard drive, and tried to install it to the empty hard drive, and still had no luck.
So adding a Virtual Machine is not going to help me if I can't even install it in a Non-Virtual Machine.

Thanks anyway.
The difference is that VMWare creates virtual devices, it does not control them directly, even it's hard disk, so the devices are actually controlled by Windows, this means that if your windows works fine, vmware will create a machine with totally standard ( *and* supported ) virtual devices, so linux or any other OS can be installed without problems.

It's worth to try... but you need to read, you can't go to linux if you can't read tons of documentation, even as user-friendly as it is getting every day.

hope you find a workaround, anybody else have a suggestion ?

Regards,
-garisoain

Author

Commented:
>>It's worth to try... but you need to read, you can't go
>>to linux if you can't read tons of documentation, even
>>as user-friendly as it is getting every day.
My problem is that my Video cards are not listed in Linux list, and Linux can't seem to probe the card for correct settings.

Author

Commented:
FYI:
The version of Linux I have is 6.x.
I've tried
SuSE Linux 6.3
Turbo Linux 6.0
Red Hat Linux Premium Edditon 6.0

None of them worked.
You can Try Slackware 8.1 for a full install, if your video card is VESA2 compatible, you can use the framebuffer XServer,  no need to use the specific video drivers.

(most of modern video cards are VESA2 compatible)

And, VMWare creates a Linux-Compatible virtual video card for the virtual machine, so you don't need to worry about your real video card if you try to install Linux on VMWare.

My suggestion, the safest choice is to install VMWare and RedHat on top of it, give it a try!, you will be able to use your windows OS at any moment during installation so you will be able to check documentation and ask for support, and it won't hurt your already running Windows.

Author

Commented:
Well, that all sounded great, and I was ready to buy the product (VmWare), until I saw the price.
$299.00 !!!!

That's way over my buget.

If I don't get a better answer, I'll award you the points, as I'll probably go this route as a last resort when I can buget it.

Thanks
hehehe, indeed an expensive piece of software.

And trial for only 30 days.

The inexpensive solution is using linux slackware, and use the framebuffer x server to avoid problems with your video card.

http://slackware.com

Of course, this will take more time, repartition of your disk,  and also, the easy-but-not-graphical installation of Slackware.

=) Not a matter of points, have enough for a lifetime, and since they never sent my EE T-Shirt, I don't really care for them anymore.

Have a good day, and good luck !
Are you just wanting to install and learn Linux? Setting up partition space to install linux doesn't make sense to you because you don't want to waste time if you find you don't like linux... or you don't have the space? I'm not sure what your objective is. Here are some thoughts.

The learning curve for linux is pretty steep so you won't be able to install and learn linux in a day (or a month, for that matter). It takes some serious effort. I might be wrong, and you will pick it up quickly, but that's not ordinarily the case. You might ask yourself if you want to make the effort.

If you are motivated to learn linux, it might make sense to perform an fairly standard install into a partition setup for linux. This would be least complicated. Keep in mind that your past experience does not determine your next experience. Part of your past problems may be that you tried older versions of linux. For example, Redhat version 8.0 is greatly improved and much, much easier to install. Plus, it has instructions at every step of the install and initial setup. Even though your video card may not be supported, linux may still install such that you can then properly configure the card afterwards. You may want to search Google for other people's experience with your video card (your card's name + linux).  I may be way out there with these comments because I don't know what your original problems were. But, before I'd spend a lot of time and money, I would give RH 8.0 a try. (You can download the iso's at linuxiso.org). If you still have the separate drive, try installing to that (make sure you erase it during the install).  Then, if you experience problems, post the specifics here. Someone may be able help you. Just provide as much detail as you can. If it turns out that your video card jsut won't work, it may make more sense to consider buying an new one. The price of cards these days is probably less than the solutions posed herein. And, you may end up with a better card than you had.
> -- imaginant

Author

Commented:
I'm already currently downloading RedHat 8.0, although it's taking for ever to download.  (3 Days and counting).
I'm on the last file now.

My purpose for installing Linux is for development.
I'm creating some libraries which I want to be platform independant.
So I'm mainly going to be using Linux for Testing and Development purposes.

>>it may make more sense to consider buying an new one.
>>The price of cards these days is probably less than the
>>solutions posed herein. And, you may end up with a
>>better card than you had.
My video cards are very expensive, and I don't want to down grade my video cards just for the purpose of installing Linux.

So I'm looking for a solution that will work with my curøºé^ hardware.
Axter:

Look for your video hardware on this list:
http://hardware.redhat.com/hcl/?pagename=hcl&view=advsearch#form

Choose:
Hardware Class: Video Device/Controller
Release: Red Hat Linux 8.0
Axter:
Thanks for the clarification. I think your on the right track by trying RH 8.0 and, no, I wouldn't want to go to a lesser video card either, especially if you just want to test on linux. I didn't recognize your hardware reference, so I can't comment on that. Good luck on your download of Redhat. -- imaginant

Commented:


  QNX !

             Cheers
I guess calinutz means the QNX!, the OS. (Hey, for all I know it could have meant Quite Nice eXchange <grin>). Since Axter is installing linux for development and testing, I am not sure this specialized, UNIX-based OS is the right choice. But an interesting concept if you want to take a look: http://www.qnx.com/nc/ Apparently it has been around for a while and has been used in the space and nuclear industries. --imaginant

Author

Commented:
imaginant,
Thanks for the link, since I had NO idea what calinutz meant by QNX???.....

Commented:
Axter, try this. I assume you have a CD-W. Here you'll find some iso images of live filesystem versions of SuSE Linux. I have previously used it, dog slow since it runs from CD but it might give you a hand. Follow the link to the 'live' directories and download the one of your choice. I am currently downloading 8.1 as I want to test if I can use it to display X screens from remote machines. Don't care about the speed. AND the best bit is it's free - always a bonus.

ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/i386/

Good luck.

Mik

Author

Commented:
thwaitm,
Thanks, I'll give it a try

Commented:
Axter, try this. I assume you have a CD-W. Here you'll find some iso images of live filesystem versions of SuSE Linux. I have previously used it, dog slow since it runs from CD but it might give you a hand. Follow the link to the 'live' directories and download the one of your choice. I am currently downloading 8.1 as I want to test if I can use it to display X screens from remote machines. Don't care about the speed. AND the best bit is it's free - always a bonus.

ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/i386/

Good luck.

Mik

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