ADSL Modems

messenger
messenger used Ask the Experts™
on
Can anyone provide me a link to a good site that sells value for money ADSL modems? i am connecting with BT and am was surprised to hear that it would cost £80 from them. any ideas?

ideally i would like two microfilters with it.
Comment
Watch Question

Do more with

Expert Office
EXPERT OFFICE® is a registered trademark of EXPERTS EXCHANGE®
Try R L Supplies - they are good VF£. Much cheaper than BT and do a roaring business. Their website is:

http://www.rlsupplies.co.uk

It's not a site of beauty but it does work and the bods are helpful if you visit - not the easiest place to find but worth the effort.

Author

Commented:
ok, seems like a good site.

is usb or pci best?
Not cetain but an on-board modem will do the job - pci. The transfer rate of a modem is relatively slow so a pci based solution should be OK.
Ensure you’re charging the right price for your IT

Do you wonder if your IT business is truly profitable or if you should raise your prices? Learn how to calculate your overhead burden using our free interactive tool and use it to determine the right price for your IT services. Start calculating Now!

omb

Commented:
You might want to check out:

http://www.insight.com/uk/apps/category/index.php?GR=4&C=101&S=1009

...for both internal (PCI) or external (USB) ADSL devices. Good product descriptions and prices aren't bad

A suggestion, before making your decision, consider buying is an ADSL router with integrated switch/hub. Why? In the future, if you ever needed to connect more than 1 PC to your ADSL line, then this would be the perfect solution. Although a little more expensive than a bog-standard ADSL modem (prices go from about £70), they give you multi-user/pc access, hub/switch for a network (some even give our DHCP addresses and act as print servers).Check out:

http://www.insight.com/uk/apps/category/index.php?GR=4&C=109&S=1057

Good luck!
omb's suggestion is a good one but a bit more expensive. It all depends on how you intend to expand you computer and whether you have or will have more than one computer and/or many printers scanner. But if you've only got one machine and have plenty of USB ports on it then there's no need to buy anything other than the internal ADSL board. It all comes down to £££'s and your plans.
rid

Commented:
If you can imagine at some future point in time having more than one computer that you want to go on the internet with, get a standalone modem that has RJ45 output for normal CAT5 cable. Network cards and hubs are cheap. USB or internal modem solutions are not very flexible.

Regards
/RID

Author

Commented:
goodness i've sparked a debate.

i was hoping to get a cheap adsl modem but connect two computers to the internet by network.

so comp1 would have the modem and network card and comp2 would have network card and connected to comp1. I know they connect together(TCP/IP) as I have played games between them.

Would comp2 be able to connect to the internet like this?
rid

Commented:
Yes.
But you need to run comp1 all the time. You need to run some software for sharing of the internet connection from comp1. If you care about security and flexibility, you may find that a standalone modem and a router/hub give more real value for money than running for example windows ICS or something like that on comp1, together with some fiewall application.

Regards
/RID

Author

Commented:
standalone modem = not connected to any computer?

so do the computer connect to the hub, which connects to the modem and then that connects to the telephone line?

rick
You can connect two pc's together and have only one modem for the net. The machine without the modem connects through the other machine - provided you have set the gateway as the machine with the modem and you have selected DCHP (or is it DHCP - can't remember).  Not all ISP's allow this but if you have an ADSL linkage they usually do. You don't need any hubs or other bits of kit just an inexpensive NIC board in each machine and some CAT5 wiring. The NIC boards cost about £7 each and 20 metres of CAT5 wiring about £17. It's not that difficult and is very satisfying when you get it to work. Just remember to 'share' the drives otherwise each computer will not see the other machine. To start with try hard not to go for any passwords - they are a total pain and can scramble up everything. So for about £30 and some effort of your part you will be able to share files and printers between two machines. Scanners are apparently not 'shareable' unless very expensive - so I'm told. Mine certainly is not 'shareable'.

Whether you use TCP/IP or IPX/SFX (I think I've got it right - not sure) depends as far as I can make out on the operating system(s) you are using. You can load up a number of different protocols simultaneously so it should not be a problem. WinXP appears to like IPX/SFX and the MS network notes suggest this in preference to TCP/IP. Mind you if you look at many other threads on this site on this subject you will get many different answers on which is the best protocol to adopt. Not a perfect answer but whatever works is probably good enough!

Good luck - by the way

http://www.rlsupplies.co.uk

supplied all my bits of kit. I wish I had shares in them!
rid

Commented:
Standalone = a separate unit, connected either to a computer, or to a hub/switch/, directly or through a router. In essence, as you said:
"so do the computer connect to the hub, which connects to the modem and then that connects to the telephone line?"

Regards
/RID

Author

Commented:
personally i think patrickab2 has been the most helpful. this is the method that i think i shall adopt. anyone disagree?

Do more with

Expert Office
Submit tech questions to Ask the Experts™ at any time to receive solutions, advice, and new ideas from leading industry professionals.

Start 7-Day Free Trial