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How to restrict users on a Y2K network

Posted on 2003-02-19
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Last Modified: 2010-03-19
I have networked my computer with my brother-in-law so that his family can have access to my music, movies and games, but am uneasy about it because it appears that they can move files and delete. When I try to restrict access to modify it automatically selects to deny read & execute, list folders contents, read and write. What I am trying to do is to protect my file structure and still share the contents. I do have a firewall "Tiny Personal Firewall" but am new to both networking and the use of firewalls. I also have a built in firewall on my Belkin "4-port Cable/DSL Gateway Router", but the options that I find in the manual offer sharing as an all or nothing arrangement too.

Can I set it up so that they can look, listen and play but not change anything in my files on my end?

NOTE: Both computers are Windows 2000. I am the Administrator and he is a user in workgroup.
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Question by:MadDatta
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7 Comments
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:Mikealcl
ID: 7981941
You should be able to set "permissions" on the files so that you can restrict user access.  

if you right click on the directory that you are sharing you should see 3 tabs at the top.  General Sharing and Security.  You want to use Security.  Simply add the user < ur brother in law> and give him read and execute access.  You should also give him list access.  

if you have any problems with this email me at Mikeal@nospam.Infinithost.com remove the "nospam" to email.

 
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Expert Comment

by:woriar3
ID: 7983338
Yes, you need to restrict certain folders and subfolders.
It takes a little playing around with sometimes but you will get it right.
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LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:magarity
ID: 7984058
When you networked it, how did you share the files in the first place?  By sharing all of drive 'C'?  ONLY share subfolders!  In the topmost shared subfolder, select the shares permissions.  (right-click, sharing, permissions)  Give 'everyone' full access.  The go out of the shares permissions to the regular NTFS permissions.  (right-click, properties, security)  Give 'everyone' read-only and list-contents permissions.  Make sure only you and 'system' keep full control.
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Author Comment

by:MadDatta
ID: 7989107
No I am not sharing a whole drive. I am sharing about eight subfolders on three hard drives spanned across about five partitions. Within those folders are about eight hundred other lower root folders. In these folders are games that require installation into their own titled folders. Music categorized alphabetically and then by band, EX: "H:\My Music\~~D files\Dilbert McClinton\Dilbert McClinton - Stir it up.mp3" and "G:\My Music\~~O files\Otis Redding\Otis Redding - Stand by me.mp3" and so on and so on. And movies organized by type grouped in separate folders as well. I do want to share the subfolders and the lower root folders contained in them, but after three years of hard work getting everything organized and keeping it that way I don't want things moved or lost.

I tried the first suggestion but the moment I click the deny modify in "My Music-Properties-Security-Permissions: it automatically denies everything except for full control which includes "list folder contents" and "Read"

Is there a higher place to start in security settings with advanced options offered???

Thanks for help here...
Dave
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:Mikealcl
ID: 7993345
MadDatta i made the assumption that you were using a NTFS formated installation of windows 2000.  is it possible that you are using a FAT32 installation?

if so, to properly control user access, you will want to convert the drive over to NTFS.

Mikeal
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LVL 13

Accepted Solution

by:
magarity earned 150 total points
ID: 7995623
My Music-Properties-Security-Permissions
then:

Unselect 'allow inheritable permissions from parent object to this object'

Agree to the warning with 'copy'.  Then ADD yourself and system.  Give yourself and system full access and 'everyone' read and list-contents.  When finished, use 'apply' instead of just OK.  Never forget about the system account when setting permissions!
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Author Comment

by:MadDatta
ID: 7996446
Yea mikealcl, the reason for so many partitions is because I have two fat32 partitions on two of my disks for duel boot purposes. I would rather all NTFS, but have to keep WIN98 format for games for my children and thank you magarity because that worked.

My e-mail is Mad_Datta@cox.net if anyone needs anything or help from me...

Thanx all,
Mad_Datta
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