use case

Dear experts,

I am trying to model some use case for our project. But, I suddenly realize that I am not totally clear about which business process I should use for creating use case? Should it be the "old" process we currently use or the "new" process we are going to build?

Thanks.
changcy77Asked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

eeyore7250Commented:
Use cases are requirements for an application. The existing applications would/should have already had its use case scenarios defined. If you are creating a new application that is what you will need to define the use cases for.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
twalgraveCommented:
Typically you build a use case for explaining what will happen in the future with your software.  So it should be the new.  However, you may be being asked to document the old system so that would be the old.
0
xyzzerCommented:
Everyhing depends on the purpose of the model. As mentioned above - usually you build your Use Case Diagram before you start coding. If you are planning to build the new process you should do it the way you want it to work, so based on the old process, some experiences, reflections and possibly audition - you should build the use case diagram you want to implement. For me - it's the first step to UML modelling the project. Then come the class diagrammes and sequence diagrammes. After that - you can build the project's frame in Java, C++ or whatever, so that the documentation is strongly tied to the code.
Rational Rose is quite a good tool for that (and not a cheap one unfortunately) that I used at school.
Documenting the old system is less useful, but might be required at some times - either legally or because of the need to control a huge project.

--Filip
0
Ultimate Tool Kit for Technology Solution Provider

Broken down into practical pointers and step-by-step instructions, the IT Service Excellence Tool Kit delivers expert advice for technology solution providers. Get your free copy now.

twalgraveCommented:
Filip,
Perhaps you do or do not know this so I will pass it along.  If you have Visual Studio Enterprise edition, you have a scaled down version of Rational Rose called Visual Modeller.  Unfortunately, it won't help changcy77 as it doesn't contain a use case designer, but just in case you didn't know...
0
xyzzerCommented:
Thanks for a hint. What does this Visual Modeller let me do then?
0
twalgraveCommented:
It let's you model the classes and interfaces for the program.
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Programming

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.

Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.