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Access Windows files from Linux

Posted on 2003-02-24
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I have 2 operating systems in my hard disk. Red Hat Linux 8 and XP. Is there any chance to access the documents of the XP (linux) when i am using linux (XP)?

 Thanks
 aristotles
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Question by:aristotles
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timothyha22 earned 100 total points
ID: 8008634
Here is a web page that will tell you everything you need to know.

Thanks

http://www.linuxworld.com/linuxworld/lw-2001-01/lw-01-legacy.html
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by:linxit
linxit earned 100 total points
ID: 8009316
One point that the webpage mentioned by timothyha22 fails to point out, is that if you have an NTFS filesystem (default with XP??), then it's not so simple.

As NTFS support is still experimental, it is not compiled in by default. So you need to compile it in first before you can use 'mount -t ntfs'.

Let me know if you need to know how to do this.

Andy
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by:heskyttberg
ID: 8012036
Hi!

I would be careful with NTFS linux support on XP.
Since XP uses NTFS 5.0, and NT uses NTFS 4 or something.

And NTFS support in Linux was built to support NT, so not sure they included the new NTFS yet.

Regards
/Hans - Erik Skyttberg
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by:linxit
ID: 8015207
Indeed. I once compiled in NTFS support to rescue a damaged (by XP) XP disk on Red Hat 7.3 (using the kernel-source RPM) and it hung the machine as soon as I mounted the disk.

However, I then downloaded and compiled the 2.5.25 (latest at the time) kernel and was able to recover all my data without any problems.

XP then disappeared from my life without trace and all my boxes are now running Red Hat 8.0 :-)

As a warning - never try to write to NTFS from Linux - it WILL corrupt the filesystem (not necessarily fatally, but requires a combination of a Linux utility (ntfsfix) and Scandisk after every write to rescue it).

Andy
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by:CleanupPing
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aristotles:
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