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Opposite word for "Busy Road"

Hi Friends

Could you please let me know the opposite word for "busy Road"?
"is it silent road or desertted Road"?

Matter is most urgent

Thanks in advance

Shibu
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ssshibu
Asked:
ssshibu
1 Solution
 
ShadowWarrior111Commented:
It is deserted Road... You cannot use silent on road.
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ssshibuAuthor Commented:
Thank you very much.....
shibu
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Philip PinnellCommented:
A "quiet road" would be more appropriate.
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TheBeaverCommented:
I think its a localised thing. Here in Austrtalia we tend to say "empty road"
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HamdyHassanCommented:
Mr/Google said
Quiet road returs 1,760,000 hit
deserted Road returns 282,000  hit
silent road   returns 600 hit
empty Road means empty

That means "Quiet road" is the answer.
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billiousCommented:
HandyHassan:
Not necessarily!
Empty road is so empty, no-one writes about it.
Silent road isn't quite as empty, and a few people have written about it
and so on...

I agree with your conclusion, but not with your methodology

...Bill
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Handy HolderSaggar makers bottom knockerCommented:
Never heard the phrase 'silent road' but 'quiet road' is very commmon.
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GlennRay36Commented:
"Quiet road", "silent road", and "empty road" are not quite colloquial enough.

I'd go for "quiet street".
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MacRaeCommented:
Quiet cul-de-sac.
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Handy HolderSaggar makers bottom knockerCommented:
French for dead end - don't worry, I lived in humber doucy lane for quite a while.

Grindle anyone...?
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ShadowWarrior111Commented:
"is it silent road or desertted Road"?
I think the answer needed by ssshibu is either silent road or deserted road if you read the question properly.
Btw, can a road be silent?? LOL..
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FlamingSwordCommented:
Between choice of only those two, it has to be deserted. But deserted means none, which is opposite of full, and 'busy' is not same a full up. So.. opposite should have some little traffic. What's it take to win this here puzzle? ssshibu?
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SunBowCommented:
1) Deserted           (no traffic)
2) Rush Hour           (may be more traffic than busy, but no one moving; aka parking lot)
3) Parking Lot            (designated) part of road)
4) Traffic Jam             (often lane blockage due to road work, accident, or someone getting ticket)
5) Gridlock                (no one moves because other is in way, a chain that goes full circle)
6) Gapers' Block           (people drive slower to see what may be accident victim on side of road, but road is not blocked)
7) parallel parking        (more specific than #3)
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SunBowCommented:
supplemental on google - many versions of text are copied time and again from server to server, maybe because some teacher thinks a work important.  So same article on many servers by a single stupid reporter could even have a very high hit rate as mentioned above. But it has nothing to do with readability or usability, for unmentioned as well are the hit rates for the web pages having the text in question. Personally, I go either way on the counter aspect, and appreciate thus the value of asking the experts here in this forum to assess what is real in the world.
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ShadowWarrior111Commented:
Wow SunBow, that quite some info that you have given. It really enhance my english alot.
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jpkempCommented:
not so busy road
almost empty road
very quiet road
traffic-deprived road
dawdle hour (opposite of rush hour, which is a bit of a misnomer isn't it)
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greetselvaCommented:
quiet road will be more suitable
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TRUENEUTRALCommented:
Websters defines road as:
An open, generally public way for the passage of vehicles, people, and animals

and busy as:
Sustaining much activity

Antonyms for busy include: lazy, inactive, idle

Antonyms for road include: private drive, blockade

So to be accurate, the opposite of "busy road" would have to meet the defintion:
a private way for the passage of vehicles, people, or animals that sustains little or no activity.

good candidates for this definition are:

lazy private drive
inactive private drive
idle blockade

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jpkempCommented:
Interesting point of view, trueneutral, however:

The antonym for something must be for the thing as a whole, not the combination of antonyms of its constituents.

For example, by your logic, the antonym of "very bad" would be "not very good", but this obviously is NOT the antonym of "very bad", in fact it is a synonym!

Jeff
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JohnChapinCommented:
What is the matter with you people?
If a busy road is a Highway,
then a quiet road is a Byway!
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SunBowCommented:
8) Dead End                 (no through traffic)
9) Local Only               (road for residents, not for long haul trailers or tourists)
10) cul-de-sac               (as from MacRae except "quiet" adjective is redundant)
11) Skyline Drive             (few to venture to altitudes)
12) Scenic Overlook            (doesn't pay to be 'busy' at edge of a cliff)
13) Cruising on Highway         (good space between vehicles at higher speeds)

I've heard of busy road, but do not hear people talk of silent quiet noiseless roads. In the dead of night with no vehicle in sight, I have heard "deserted" used. This talk of quiet and silent roads sounds more like literary device than how people really talk in my neighborhoods.

The word busy in this context refers to a high volume of traffic, with no inference to destinations or speed, but as to speed, it is more a synonym for phrase "city traffic". "Quiet", "silent", I assume, refers to noticing the lack of noise of tires meeting road, lack of alarming horns, etc. thus would refer to sound, not to a quantity of vehicles, but to sounds of vehicles moving. Quiet Road could also be used like "quiet neighborhood" or more so a "quiet part of town", where reference is to news, and more often infers a lack of crime or bad news. So for a road, it would infer lack of sirens of ambulances and police, and fire trucks and cabbie horns. But again that is more about sound than volume or quantity of vehicles. It can be lack of events that are noteworthy outside of local community. So I submit that concerning "silent" as opposite to "busy" when applied to "road", is really an apples/oranges situation, the two adjectives refer to different attributes. "Deserted", OTOH, is a reference to quantity of vehicles, not the noise they generate. So it at least refers to same attribute for a road. Whether it is true opposite or not is subjective, whether you think opposite to high volume is low volume, if a zero volume qualifies as "low".

Now if you noticed order of comments here, you should see I think that there may be a possibility to use a more specific phrase to provide the meaning desired, for whatever the context is that one is trying to convey.
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TRUENEUTRALCommented:
I think cul-de-sac would be the most accurate representation of an "opposite" for "busy road".

As has been stated by several commentors, there is no true opposite.

The problem you are running into seems to be an inherant property of the english language.  While adjectives usually have specific antonyms (or opposites), multi-word phrases and nouns rarely do.  

Thus, it is easy to find the opposite of the adjective busy (idle, still, inactive), but road is a noun.  It is a "thing".  "Busy" is the type of road, so the opposite type of road would be inactive, still, or idle.

Hope that helps
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Handy HolderSaggar makers bottom knockerCommented:
Easy street?
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Gingerbeer3Commented:
How about "Most Mellow Motorway"
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brakmatCommented:
what about slow road...when Im at work and it is busy I say "It's busy", but when it is not busy I say "It's slow today"
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TRUENEUTRALCommented:
Several of the answers above are great.

I don't think this guy is ever going to cough up that 25 points :)

How about dead end?
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MacRaeCommented:
For Sunbow

>> 10) cul-de-sac               (as from MacRae except "quiet" adjective is redundant)


No, I don't think so.

One entrance to our local school is onto a cul-de-sac and twice a day that cul-de-sac is the busiest street in the suburb.
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cdhildebrandtCommented:
In Texas, we sometimes refer to an un-busy road as an "open road."  I know the opposite of open is closed, but we use Texas English where I'm from.  I have heard of a "slow" road in the context of traffic was "slow" (meaning lightly traveled compared to other days) on the road today.  If this is a language translation question, and you are not interested in just a one word answer then I would opt for "There was very little traffic on the road today", "Traffic was light today" or "There were very few cars on the road today".

You could just as easily add "not a" in front of "busy road" and be very accurate in reaching the absolute opposite of "busy road".

Probably too late to help, but hopefully informative.

Carl
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soul_less_at_homeCommented:
no1 writes about silent roads, because no1 has ever heard of them
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pjedmondCommented:
How about lonesome road?

Obviously to see the road, you will be there, and if no-one else is there then it is lonesome?
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soul_less_at_homeCommented:
why does anyone actually need to know the word anyway? wouldn't mst people just say, hey, less traffic today than usual.
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TRUENEUTRALCommented:
Uhhh.... yeah, if you speak english you say that...

If not, I guess you would say something like "the road is having today unusual smaller traffic..."

:)
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SunBowCommented:
:)
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jpkempCommented:
Good grief is this Q still open?

"Matter is most urgent" - Shibu
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james95035Commented:
Thats easy: unbusy road

Jim
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GivenRandyCommented:
Quiet Space.
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TRUENEUTRALCommented:
Dead horse + Stick = this.question
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jpkempCommented:
unsubmitting...
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jpkempCommented:
unsubsuming...
unsubmiring...
unsubmarining...
unsubscribing...
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nicholaspCommented:
"doarysub" would be the opposite WORD for "busy road"... as for the words that convey the opposite meaning... there is no single answer due to the nature of the english language.
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gotenksCommented:
busy morning and silent morning doesn't match.
noisy morning and silent morning quite ok.
opposite of busy is free.
as busy means 'sustaining much activity' (e.g busy morning, busy lawyer)
and free can mean : unobstructed; clear: e.g a free lane
therefore it should be 'free road'. :>
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Mar_velCommented:
Non-busy field :) as where the road is it was a field or something similar and it is'nt busy. If it is the opposite then surly it is a field and it is'nt busy b cos if it was it wud'nt b the opposite
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vhawargiCommented:
simply, how about 'lazy road'?
:)
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b612_foreverCommented:
'Blocked Road', no one enter so it is impossible to be busy
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DeAnCommented:
idle terrain

since terrain was there before any road was constructed,  it is as close to opposite that I can think of.
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jayqazCommented:
placid road.

Sounds perfect to me.
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teliotCommented:
nonono its Dirt Road!! :P
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NevHollandCommented:
Can a road be busy? Is that physically possible?

I would have thought that the road is a road regardless of its' state. The emphasis should really be placed on the traffic. As it is the traffic that blocks or reduces the average speed on the road. The road would stay the same regardless.
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DelenlillCommented:
"Calm Road" would be the correct answer

Unless you need the opposite from road too then i have no ideal.
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