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A very simple question about assigning IP addresses to routers

Posted on 2003-02-28
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Last Modified: 2010-04-17
Hi.

Please see this diagram.

http://www.geocities.com/killedbyvb/index.htm

The question is...is it possible to assign IP addresses to the serial interfaces of the routers in a way as shown in this diagram? That is, can more than 2 routers share the same Network ID for their serial link?

Please provide me a link to a web site like CISCO, Microsoft, etc. to authenticate that it is possible.

Thanks in advance.

Regards.
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Question by:KilledByVB
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11 Comments
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:pedrow
ID: 8043395
yes.
i forget which version of code it came out in, but /31 serial link networks now can be done. it's pretty non-standard. Even  though it's possible, I don't think I've seen anyone do it in  a production environment.

having a hard time finding anything specific about it on cco...

i'll keep looking.
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LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:rrhunt28
ID: 8044235
Why would you want too?
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LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 8044512
You can use .1-.2, .5-.6, .9-.10, with /32 mask
Otherwise you will get overlapping subnets on a single interface and Cisco router won't let you do that. -VLSM-

You can, however, use point-to-multipoint connections such as frame-relay or ISDN with all sites on the same subnet.

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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:pedrow
ID: 8044838
hmmm...this feature might only be available in the S train...so you're probably SOL.
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LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 8044882
oops.. /32 mask should read /30 mask in my post above.

I caught it before you did, pedrow.. <8-}
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:pedrow
ID: 8044905
yeah...rrhunt28...i agree. It was available to us but seemed like a kludge and non-standard, so we never bothered using it.
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LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:rrhunt28
ID: 8044929
Well, the big point of routers is to segment the broadcast domains for security and speed.  And if you put the same routers in the same domain, it seems useless to me.  You could use a switch.  Not to mention the switch would actully be faster.  
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LVL 50

Expert Comment

by:Don Johnston
ID: 8046072
If they're point to point links and you're trying to save address space, can you use ip un-numbered?

-don
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LVL 50

Expert Comment

by:Don Johnston
ID: 8046073
If they're point-to-point links and you're trying to save address space, you can use ip un-numbered.

-don
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LVL 7

Accepted Solution

by:
pedrow earned 1000 total points
ID: 8046640
What do you mean putting the routers in teh same domain?

Do you understand CIDR (classless inter-domain routing)?

It's the use of the network *mask* that defines the network boundaries, not the numbers themselves. if you wanted to number your serial links in the manner which you have described, it would indicate (at least to me) that you've decided to use /31 network masks to number your links. You ask if it's possible. I say yes, depending on the version of code you are running. point-to-point links are traditionally numbered with 30 bit masks providing two 'usable' ip addresses in the network, one network number and one broadcast. using 31 bit masks is possible, but unconventional. What are you trying to do?

0
 

Author Comment

by:KilledByVB
ID: 8051683
Hi.

I am thankful to all of you for your help and time on this subject.

Actually I am a student and there was a question in the networking's examination about building a network. In that network we had to use routers. Because I assigned 3 bits to Network IDs (while using a class B network ID) therefore I had only 6 subnets to use. This diagram is not the actual diagram that I made of that network. It just shows that how I assigned IP addresses to the serial links of the routers because I had no extra network ID left to assign to each serial link :)

I just wanted to confirm my answer. But I think I will loose marks because it seems impossible :(

I think pedrow gave the most suitable answer. Therefore he deserves the points. But lrmoore also helped a lot, therefore I will give him points too. I am also thankful to others as well who answered this question. Thank you all.

Regards.

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