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I want to create a game with DELPHI but........?

I´m an expert programmer in delphi and i would like to  make a game but i need some advice to begin, for example i want to cerate a game like StarCraft or Age of Empire which software or technologies i need to create something like those!!
Thank a lot
0
Hobbiett
Asked:
Hobbiett
1 Solution
 
MagmaiKHCommented:
Search for something called DelphiX, it's a Delphi Unit that warps DirectX.

gamedev.net has a forum called 'Turbo' that is essential for Delphi game develment.
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AlimonsterCommented:
The graphics style you're looking for is known as "isometric".  There's some good information about it over on gamedev: <a href="http://www.gamedev.net/reference/list.asp?categoryid=44">http://www.gamedev.net/reference/list.asp?categoryid=44</a>.

There's a heap of component sets available for Delphi.  Here's a brief list of what you want to look for:

DelphiX: <a href="http://turbo.gamedev.net/delphix.asp
">http://turbo.gamedev.net/delphix.asp</a>
PowerDraw: <a href="http://turbo.gamedev.net/powerdraw.asp
">http://turbo.gamedev.net/powerdraw.asp</a>
Project Omega: <a href="http://www.blueworldtech.com/ds
">http://www.blueworldtech.com/ds</a>
GameVision: <a href="http://gamevision.jarroddavis.com
">http://gamevision.jarroddavis.com</a>

Each of the component sets have slightly different characteristics:

DelphiX wraps around a lot of DirectX - but is mostly used for 2D work, rather than 3D work.  This is okay for what you want.  However, bear in mind that it won't give you some nice features in hardware, such as alpha blending, since it's usually used to wrap around DirectDraw, which is 2D based.

Another sticking point of DelphiX is that it's difficult to set up in later Delphi versions (6 and 7).  There's a tutorial on Turbo about setting it up for Delphi 6, but a lot of people have problems.  Someone (Maxx's Delphi site) has converted it to Delphi 7.  You can also investigate UnDelphiX (http://turbo.gamedev.net/undelphix.asp), which is a minor conversion of DelphiX to use standard JEDI header files (http://www.delphi-jedi.org).

PowerDraw is a newer project.  It's technically impressive (lots of big and clever features) and it's growing by the day.  PowerDraw wraps around Direct3D - this is good if you want your game to be playable on newer hardware. As a result, you can get nice effects (blending, rotation) for free!  A downside of PowerDraw is that it doesn't come with a sound system (this is intentional by the author [LifePower]).  You can combine PowerDraw with FMod or BASS (though you have to pay for their use if you sell your game).  PowerDraw comes with a software renderer if that's your thing.

Project Omega is a similar system to PowerDraw - again, it wraps up Direct3D and other parts of DirectX.  The Project Omega site is forums-only for the moment while they renovate it, but you should be able to find the packages in the Delphi Sanctuary forums (http://www.blueworldtech.com/ds).  Some people find Project Omega to be easier to use than PowerDraw (YMMV, of course).  Project Omega comes with a sound system that wraps around FMod, I believe.

GameVision is a new tech (again, a Direct3d wrapper).  It's another alternative to the two above.  It is highly object oriented and has some neat touches (e.g. plug-in, support for zip archives I think, etc.).

Choose any of the above; the ones wrapping around Direct3D will give you better performance on new systems and will allow you more freedom.  All the above encapsulate tasks such as game timing (do *not* use a TTimer for your game timing btw!).

You can get help on these at the respective forums, or at these two forums:

Turbo: http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/forum.asp?forum_id=30&forum_title=turbo

DGDev: http://terraqueous.f2o.org/dgdev

Make your choice ;).  I have a tutorial on isometric tiles (it's a conversion/translation of Jim Adams' article in gamedev.net's resources section): http://www.alistairkeys.co.uk/isotile1.shtml  -- I used DirectDraw by itself (standard JEDI headers) for that one.

You might also want to have a look at the isometric tutorial on www.delphigamer.com (specifically, here: http://www.savagesoftware.com.au/DelphiGamer/showarticles.php?articleid=2&page=1).

Finally, have a look at the following, which is a complete open-sourced isometric tile engine: http://sourceforge.net/projects/jedi-isoax
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AlimonsterCommented:
Oops!  Here are the links in the above post again, since it messed up.  If there are mods around, could you get rid of that first post :(.

The post again...
-----------------

The graphics style you're looking for is known as "isometric".  There's some good information about it over on gamedev: http://www.gamedev.net/reference/list.asp?categoryid=44.

There's a heap of component sets available for Delphi.  Here's a brief list of what you want to look for:

DelphiX: http://turbo.gamedev.net/delphix.asp
PowerDraw: http://turbo.gamedev.net/powerdraw.asp
Project Omega: http://www.blueworldtech.com/ds
GameVision: http://gamevision.jarroddavis.com

Each of the component sets have slightly different characteristics:

DelphiX wraps around a lot of DirectX - but is mostly used for 2D work, rather than 3D work.  This is okay for what you want.  However, bear in mind that it won't give you some nice features in hardware, such as alpha blending, since it's usually used to wrap around DirectDraw, which is 2D based.

Another sticking point of DelphiX is that it's difficult to set up in later Delphi versions (6 and 7).  There's a tutorial on Turbo about setting it up for Delphi 6, but a lot of people have problems.  Someone (Maxx's Delphi site) has converted it to Delphi 7.  You can also investigate UnDelphiX (http://turbo.gamedev.net/undelphix.asp), which is a minor conversion of DelphiX to use standard JEDI header files (http://www.delphi-jedi.org).

PowerDraw is a newer project.  It's technically impressive (lots of big and clever features) and it's growing by the day.  PowerDraw wraps around Direct3D - this is good if you want your game to be playable on newer hardware. As a result, you can get nice effects (blending, rotation) for free!  A downside of PowerDraw is that it doesn't come with a sound system (this is intentional by the author [LifePower]).  You can combine PowerDraw with FMod or BASS (though you have to pay for their use if you sell your game).  PowerDraw comes with a software renderer if that's your thing.

Project Omega is a similar system to PowerDraw - again, it wraps up Direct3D and other parts of DirectX.  The Project Omega site is forums-only for the moment while they renovate it, but you should be able to find the packages in the Delphi Sanctuary forums (http://www.blueworldtech.com/ds).  Some people find Project Omega to be easier to use than PowerDraw (YMMV, of course).  Project Omega comes with a sound system that wraps around FMod, I believe.

GameVision is a new tech (again, a Direct3d wrapper).  It's another alternative to the two above.  It is highly object oriented and has some neat touches (e.g. plug-in, support for zip archives I think, etc.).

Choose any of the above; the ones wrapping around Direct3D will give you better performance on new systems and will allow you more freedom.  All the above encapsulate tasks such as game timing (do *not* use a TTimer for your game timing btw!).

You can get help on these at the respective forums, or at these two forums:

Turbo: http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/forum.asp?forum_id=30&forum_title=turbo

DGDev: http://terraqueous.f2o.org/dgdev

Make your choice ;).  I have a tutorial on isometric tiles (it's a conversion/translation of Jim Adams' article in gamedev.net's resources section): http://www.alistairkeys.co.uk/isotile1.shtml -- I used DirectDraw by itself (standard JEDI headers) for that one.

You might also want to have a look at the isometric tutorial on www.delphigamer.com (specifically, here: http://www.savagesoftware.com.au/DelphiGamer/showarticles.php?articleid=2&page=1).

Finally, have a look at the following, which is a complete open-sourced isometric tile engine: http://sourceforge.net/projects/jedi-isoax 
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leo3dCommented:
Look www.3dstate.com

There is 3DSTATE 3D developer studio for Delphi. It is based on one of the fastest 3D engines available today delivering top quality graphics. it is optimal solution.
using it you will get top quality results within extremely short time.

Good Luck!

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nawacCommented:
I'm also a Delphi, CBuilder& VisualC programmer.
It's obvious that Delphi is powerful, thus I switched to it and found something that should really make your subject constructive.

It's named GLscene :

http://www.glscene.org/

and it worth a try !!

Nawac
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CleanupPingCommented:
Hobbiett:
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