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Scan 12 in by 12 in document

Hi,

I have a scrapbook that I want to scan. Unfortunately it is 12 in by 12 in. I can't find anybody with a scanner of this size. Can I scan it twice and combine the two halves? I have access to PaintShop Pro. I see it references Arithmetic Combining. Will this work? Somebody mentioned PhotoShop but I don't have access to that. I may try a digital camera. I guess my question is if I go with scanning it twice, am I looking at a lot of grief when I try to combine them? Any other suggestions??

Thanks!

aerol
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aerol
Asked:
aerol
1 Solution
 
weedCommented:
Scanning two halves and combining IS possible, but the results are RARELY desireable. Scanners often get fuzzy at the edges where light seeps in so it looks crummy. A digital camera probably isnt going to capture the rez you want and the quality will be lacking. To get nice results youre going to have to take it down to someone with a large scanner.
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dearsinaCommented:
I am sure that with care when placing your book and with as much overlapping as you possibly can get, a A4 scanner will be sufficient. But as 'weed' has pointed out, simply connecting two images is no good, you will need to edit them together using Photoshop or the likes.

It isn't very difficult to mend two pictures together, even if you haven't had much Photoshop experience.
 
It is definetly your best shot unless you can get access to for instance an A3 scanner. Your local print shop or university might have one laying around. Give them a try.

sina
london
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socrateezCommented:
I have successfully scanned a picture in more than two pieces and put it into one.  You just have to work with layers (which I'm sure PaintShop Pro does), make sure you have enough overlap, apply transparency to the top layer to line it up with the bottom layer, then erase some of the overlapping top with a brush that feathers.  Also be aware of color correction.
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webknotCommented:
You might contact digitalprintery.com. They have a 12x18 scanner and are doing some interesting stuff with photos, calendars, graphics, etc. and are very reasonably priced as they are oriented to the consumer market.
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aerolAuthor Commented:
I scanned the document and put the pictures together in PaintShop Pro. It wasn't too bad and even though you can see the "seam" I'm happy with what I have.

Thanks to all.

Dave P
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dearsinaCommented:
Please give your points to the answer that helped you the most. Thanks.

sina
london
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aerolAuthor Commented:
I guess socrateez helped me the most. I did work with layers in PaintShop Pro but I didn't go to the effort of applying transparency and I didn't use brush with feathers. I'll use this information in the future when I have to scan pictures and I at that point care more about perfection. In my case currently I really didn't need a near perfect job. Next time it may be different.

Thanks all!

Aerol
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