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Cisco 2620

First I just want tell everyone on these boards, "they rock!!"

You guys have made it clear that equal-cost load balancing is the way to go. Now, what to you think the best way to backup that single router with two T1's would be?

A Mirrored setup of some sort?

What protocol/method would you think would be the best way to do this?


Thanks
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damasco
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damasco
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1 Solution
 
lrmooreCommented:
Ultimately, sure, a second router also with dual T1's to a different ISP, different T1 carrier, HSRP between the two routers, bgp with the ISP's. Extra ethernet port on each router connecting just the two routers with crossover cable for the HSRP heartbeat and IBGP, inside Ethernet ports connected to two separate switches with a cross-connection between them, all on separate UPS's.

Problem is, how far do you go with redundancy, when there is still a single point of failure whether you have 1 T1 or 15 T1's, when they all come in the same fiber line as all the telephone lines, etc into the building, and the construction crew cuts that fiber line out in the middle of the street. It all depends on the diversity of the incoming circuits. You can only do so much. You would have to design the entire facility for power and telecommunications redundancy connecting to the local CLEC SONET ring from diverse points.
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lrmooreCommented:
Better yet, a frac T3 with a five-9's SLA that provides hefty $$ incentives for the telco provider if you lose the connection, backed up by a direct Ethernet connection to the fiber ring out the other side of the building, connecting to another router and different ISP.

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pedrowCommented:
I've run many offices with two routers, with one t-1 connecting each to the upstream provider and using hsrp on the backend. The load balancing is kind of forced though, as you set up multiple lans and alternate the hsrp primary router to manually load-balance the traffic, vlan by vlan.

lrmoore's idea might be better but more expensive, and this is pretty darn effective and relatively cheap.

Whether the expensive route is worth it or not, you have to try and evaluate how much an hour of downtime would cost the company(ferinstance).

Having the second router also allows you to troubleshoot a single circuit or router without taking the whole site offline.



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damascoAuthor Commented:
Will these two seperate configurations load balance as well?
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lrmooreCommented:
Yes, with BGP if they are with different ISP's.
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damascoAuthor Commented:
Thanks!! you guys are the best!!!
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pedrowCommented:
if you're dual homed to two different isp's, you won't be able to balance inbound traffic without a bunch of tuning...prepending, route filtering, etc...
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Dr-IPCommented:
Redundancy is nice, but the quest for it can be very elusive, and it can cause other problems as well. I thought about going with two ISP’s, but I have seen so many people who have gone that route having routing problems related to having two ISP’s I decided against it.

Instead I have two T3’s going to the same ISP to different POP’s, some people say that’s not very redundant, but since they are one of the largest ISP’s in the world. Anything that takes them down will disrupt the net so much having a second ISP will be little help because for me partial internet access is no much better than no access. The way I look at it I have 90% of the best possible solution with only 10% of the baggage that comes with it.

The thing about redundancy and fault tolerance is knowing when to you have reached the point of diminishing returns. Also when you follow things out completely you will often find there comes a point where there is no acceptable redundant solution possible, like me having a second ISP since if my primary one goes down the net will be crippled anyway, or in your case as Imore pointed out the fiber your T1’s come through getting chopped up by some careless construction crew, and that happens all the time. I run that same risk too, now I could pay my Telco to run another fiber to my building on a different route to another POP, but at a million dollars a mile that’s too expensive for me to consider.    
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