Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 299
  • Last Modified:

Broadband to wired LAN

My question is geared more towards how to get our small office LAN hooked up with broadband access.

Presently, our network consists of a Compaq Proliant 5500 server running Windows 2000 Server 5 user license.  The clients are a mix of WinXP Pro and Win2k Pro boxes connected through a Linksys Etherfast 10/100 8 port hub.

What would be the best route to incorporate a cable modem internet access setup to our LAN?  Should I have the cable modem connected to a firewall then to the server?  Or, could I go from firewall directly to the hub?  Would that work or do I have to replace the hub with a router/switch?

I have been looking at different hardware firewalls, specifically, Cisco PIX 500 series and Sonic Wall SOHO3.  They seem to offer all that we need as we would like to possibly host our website. The VPN capabilities are also a plus.

If anyone could help clear this up for me it would be greatly appreciated.
0
precast_
Asked:
precast_
  • 2
  • 2
1 Solution
 
steve212Commented:
If you're willing to spend the money, I still say you can't go wrong with Cisco.  They've got some great configuration utilities on their website that allow you to virtually create exactly what you need.

I'm more familiar with DSL than I am 'broadband', but my customers usually try for a nice all-in-one router solution. You may still need the hub to allow for more connections, but the hub would be virtually transparent to the toplogy of the network, so no harm no foul.  You're right on track with Cisco in my opinion, but I think a router is a better solution.

Start here, decide which product line you're most interested in and just go from there. I believe you can automatically send an email to one of their sales reps when your done to get cost information.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/index.html

There's a lot of folks on here that have a lot of knowledge on this subject, but hopefully this gets you started in at least one of the directions.
0
 
MSGeekCommented:
Cisco just released the Cisco 831 which is a cable router with a four port switch that supports a Stateful Firewall and 3DES encryption.   It's capable enough to handle your needs, but I would also recommend a software firewall as well.

If you can afford the PIX, by all means go for it.  I have anolder version of the 831, the 806, combined with running ISA server and I have no problems.  Make sure you get any Cisco equipment from a dealer, the IOS is not transferable so when someone on EBay sells a cisco device you don't get acces to the new IOS with your purchase, you have to go buy a seperate SLA from Cisco.
0
 
BindolinyCommented:
Get a netgear router, i own two and have never had a problem, All you really need is any router. Then hook everthing up to that or you can run a cable from your hubs uplink port to the router and then clients can hook up to the hub and have i-net. The new netgear routers are a breeze to setup everything is auto configured took me about 15secs to hook it up.
0
 
MSGeekCommented:
NetGear will not even come close in performance to Cisco.  If he is utilizing a lot of bandwidth, he will need a fast router to get his monies woth out of the ISP.  I guess it all depends on what his load is now and what he thinks it will be in the future.  My first hub was a Netgear 4 port, worked great.  My second wa san 8 port, sent it back.
0
 
BindolinyCommented:
If you can pay the money Ciscos are great but most of us can gear the savings to other stuff.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Port Scanner

Check which ports are open to the outside world. Helps make sure that your firewall rules are working as intended.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

  • 2
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now