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CD-RW Linux

Posted on 2003-03-09
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I have recomplied the kernel for the option UDF read/write. UDF filesystem is similar like DirectCD in windows.
Iam able to read the CD but not able to write it.

Any idea ?
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Question by:vijay_karanth
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5 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Flash828
ID: 8100860
UDF write support is experimental code in the Linux 2.4 series kernels.  Write support can be compiled in, but is neither there by default, nor safe to use.  if you DO choose to use it you must recompile your kernel and select experimental code, UDF Read support (which is not experimental and is stable), and the UDF Write support.
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Expert Comment

by:Flash828
ID: 8100861
UDF write support is experimental code in the Linux 2.4 series kernels.  Write support can be compiled in, but is neither there by default, nor safe to use.  if you DO choose to use it you must recompile your kernel and select experimental code, UDF Read support (which is not experimental and is stable), and the UDF Write support.
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Author Comment

by:vijay_karanth
ID: 8108547
I have recomplied the kernel for UDF read / write option, but I am not able to write it. (read only)

What else I have to do, apart from kernel recomplie?
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by:jungle_kp
ID: 8110061
You will to use SCSI emulation in the kernel, or as a module, and using a SCSI device (emulate) to be able to write to it. In order to get it to work, you can use cdrecord (with option scanbus) to see if you have done everything right. If it shows up in the list of SCSI (emulation) devices, you will be able to write to it.
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Accepted Solution

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Rahmath earned 750 total points
ID: 8119677
I think you want to write a CD. in order to write a CD you dont need to recompile the kernel or to add UFS write support. to write a CD under Linux just follow the steps mentioned below.
 
     1. you want to emulate your writer as a SCSI writer. for that at the boot prompt (LILO or GRUB) specify hdc=ide-scsi
        where hdc is the device name of your cd writer is connected

    2.  After that check whether your cd-writer is emulated as a scsi device by the command
        cdrecord -scanbus      if any out given with the address of the scsi device its okay.
 
   3. then insert a blank CD, and type the command

         cdrecord -v speed=8 dev=0,0,0 -data /tmp/tocd.img

 Note : by cdrecord you can only write the images. here you replace the /tmp/tocd.img by your image
 
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