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Renaming a filesystem

Posted on 2003-03-13
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Last Modified: 2012-05-04
Is there a quick and easy way to rename a journaled filesystem in AIX?
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Question by:Sonk
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by:ahoffmann
ID: 8131214
what do you mean by "rename"? directory, mount point
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by:Tintin
ID: 8132439
I assume (like ahoffmann) that you mean the mount point.

Simply unmount the filesystem, change the mount point and remount it.

It's been a long time since I've used AIX, so I can't remember the AIX equivalent of /etc/vfstab
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by:tfewster
ID: 8135231
/etc/filesystems ;-)
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by:Kent Olsen
ID: 8136721
If you're familiar with "smitty", try this:

smitty fs

Add / Change / Show / Delete File Systems

Journaled File System (or Enhanced Journaled File System)

Change / Show Characteristics of a Journaled File System

Enter value for "NEW mount point".


Kdo

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Printaporn earned 1000 total points
ID: 8143306
umount <your file system>
mkdir < what ever name you want>
mount <your lvol device file> < new dir>
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by:Sonk
ID: 8144973
Thanks...that is what I did.  When you stated <your lvol device file> , did you mean that I could reuse the original lvol that was associated with the unmounted file?  I find it a bit confusing that the filesystem and the mount point share the same name.  Smitty would only let me change mount point names.
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by:Kent Olsen
ID: 8145130
Hi Sonk,

Be careful with that implementation.  While you've changed the mount point associated with that file system, you've not renamed the file system -- you've simply moved it.

What's worse is that this is temporary.  You've not recorded the change in /etc/filesystems.  The next time you reboot AIX the file set will revert to it's recorded mount point.  And since rebooting AIX is something that you probably don't do very often, when you take AIX down for a system upgrade next Christmas you'll probably forget about this and wonder why none of your applications will run.  :(

Kdo
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Expert Comment

by:Printaporn
ID: 8145651
Hi Sonk,
That right !,Logical volumn is the storage that you referencee with mount point name.
Example

/dev/vg00/lvol10 /aaa
umount /dev/vg00/lvol10
mkdir /bbb
mount /dev/vg00/lvol10 /bbb
then you got
/dev/vg00/lvol10 /bbb
the the data same as before.

HTH
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