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Windows 98 Users losing domain access after some time (windows 2000 server)

Posted on 2003-03-14
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Last Modified: 2010-03-18
Hello there.

We4ve just migrated a NT4 based domain to a Windows 2000 server, with new accounts and permissions (not sharing any information with the old server, IE, it was a new install). The problem is that after some time idle, computers (windows 98) lose access to the domain, cannot access any server or share, and cannot even re-logon (users have to restart their computers).

They're using static IPs, the WINS server is a NT4 server that also controls another domain. Both stations and the W2K uses that WINS. DNS is set to 127.0.0.1 on the server (clients aren't using DNS).

Any hints?

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Question by:suguinha
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5 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

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lrmoore earned 2000 total points
ID: 8139424
Try resetting the autodisconnect on the Win2K server:

LAN AutoDisconnect Win2K
http://www.winguides.com/registry/display.php/194/

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Expert Comment

by:netnightmare
ID: 8140371
If you have a 2000 server you'd be as well to run DHCP and have your clients automatically receive their IPs rather than have them static.

Dave
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Author Comment

by:suguinha
ID: 8140945
Yes, actually I've already solved that problem. However, you see... It's a nasty bug and it again tells me: "Do not trust microsoft software", once again. I was wondering if these problems only strikes me because I'm a unix guy, but no, the problem it still bad software.
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Expert Comment

by:earnestmedia
ID: 8160517
Sounds like DNS is the problem. W2K networks are base on DNS and not WINS. Your Domain controller is your DNS server, unless you already had another server running
DNS. On the client machines change their DNS IP address to that of your Domain Controller.
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Author Comment

by:suguinha
ID: 8160852
This is not a DNS problem. It's a bug in Windows 98 covered in http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;278558

And what a gruesome bug, no?... And after that, people still say that it's Unix that's complicated and complex.

We're still using WINS in the windows 2000 network with Windows 98 clients because of windows' poor DNS implementation. The only machine with a DNS pointing to the windows 2000 server is the windows 2000 server itself, since active directory don't like to run a domain controller without one.
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