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Accessing unformatted HDD space

Posted on 2003-03-18
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I was wondering how I can access the unformatted space on my hard drive. I have a Dell poweredge 500sc server with 3 40GB hard drives running RAID5.  When I installed (redhat 7.3)I left some space unformatted thinking I'd go back and format it later but I can't figure out how to do this. Output from fdisk -l is as follows:

Disk /dev/sda: 255 heads, 63 sectors, 9723 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 bytes

Device     Boot  Start  End    Blocks  Id System
/dev/sda1            1    4     32098+ de Dell Utility
/dev/sda2    *       5    9     40162+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda3           10 1030   8201182+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda4         1031 9723  69826522+  f Win95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sda5         1031 1422   3148708+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda6         1423 1577   1245006+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda7         1578 1642    522081+ 82 Linux swap
/dev/sda8         1643 1675    265041+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda9         1676 1708    265041+ 83 Linux

So it looks to me like I do not have cylinders 1709 - 9723 associated with a device.  Any suggestons as to how I can go about reclaiming this some 62GB of space?
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Question by:andrepau
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samri earned 400 total points
ID: 8165805
You could try using


fdisk /dev/sda

http://www.justlinux.com/nhf/Installation/Using_fdisk.html

and create a new partition from the remaining free space.

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by:andrepau
ID: 8167304
Thanks - I don't know why I didn't think of that.
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by:samri
ID: 8167847
busy day I think.

:)
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Expert Comment

by:Spurgeon
ID: 8180001
on linux there's mostly another tool like cfdisk.
It shows you the remaining empty space :)
Create one or a few partitions and format them using:

ext2 -> mke2fs /dev/sda*
ext3 -> mke2fs -j /dev/sda*
reiserfs -> mkreiserfs /dev/sda*

or another type of FS

Good luck,

Greetz Spurgeon


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