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Execution Timeout / Max Request Length

On my site, users will occaisionally be uploading very large files (100+ MB).  The issue I ran into was, of course, exceeding the max request length, and when that was fixed via web.config, exceeding the timeout length.

No, I know I can change the global values for the web.config file (i.e. maxRequestLength="175000", executionTimeout="99999"), but this seems to be a little dangerous, since those variables are to prevent against DoS attacks and such.

Here's my question, and it's probably an easy one.  Isn't it possible to set those values for the session?  Like ignoring the fileupload limit and sending a keep alive signal or something, so the session doesn't time out?

I'm sure this is fairly simple, but if it's more complicated than I've assumed, I'll up the points.

Thanks!
Paul
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SimmerDown
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SimmerDown
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arbertCommented:
Yes, in your global.asa file, under Sub Session_Onstart, change the following:

session.timeout=99999



However, I don't see anything for maxrequestlength.  What version of IIS are you running?

Brett
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SimmerDownAuthor Commented:
Not really my version, but it is IIS 5.0, hosted by Brinkster.  Sorry for the delay in responding, but I've been trying to contact them for a week.  Finally got through on live chat today.

Here's the scoop, according to Ken at Brinkster (a quite infuriating fellow), all of Brinkster's servers are set with a 90 second script timeout (nevermind that I had an upload going for 25 minutes before the "page cannot not be displayed" error).  So, that means regardless of where I stick the timeout setting (up my arse would be most useful at this point), it won't affect the timeout on the server.  He "assures" me this is the case (in fact, he "assured" me about 15 times).

Now, perhaps I should post this under a new question, being a newbie I'll let the community give me some direction, but I need an alternative.

I figure my options are:

1. Upload using some type of bit-stream so I can send the file in pieces, rather than one upload...but I'd still need a way to refresh the post so the script doesn't time out. (if this is best, a URI to a tutorial would be nice :) )
2. Write a Java applet to send the file from the client (the "Do you wish to install..." dialog isn't really an issue, small client base and all that).
3. ??? - perhaps an FTP funtion in ASP.net?  Maybe telling the buggers to put the thing on a CD and mail it?

Unfortunately, I've checked and many providers have the same script timeout thing, and I don't really want to switch from Brinkster anyway, even though they did hire Ken.  I need to be able to upload files upwards of 150MB, even over 56k modem (we're a graphics publishing house).

As I said, if someone more experienced on the EE thinks I should repost, I'll give up the points to arbert (even though my issue wasn't solved), or I'll up them to 200.

Thanks,
Paul
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arbertCommented:
If you are a graphics publishing house, I would recommend the java approach--especially on larger files.  If you don't create an app to handle it, you will have all kinds of problems with restartability (what happens if you stop in the middle of a 150mb file) and corruption.

Brett
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SimmerDownAuthor Commented:
Well, turns out changing providers makes the most sense.  We also had to upgrade to a dedicated server, but that works for our future plans anyway.  Thanks for your help arbert, I appreciate it.
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