• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 228
  • Last Modified:

Stange broadcasts seen from all NT/XP workstations at the same time

Hi,
We are working on NT and XP workstations.  I noticed some slowness in our network this morning and checked to see if something was going on.  I noticed that all the workstations were sequentially sending a broadcast to 224.0.0.10.

I am not sure what this is or what the 224 address is used for.

Any advice or thoughts would be helpful.

Thanks,

Jay
0
dpimcadmin
Asked:
dpimcadmin
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
1 Solution
 
dpimcadminAuthor Commented:
Just clarifying,
it wasn't a broadcast it is an EIGRP with a size of 78
0
 
lrmooreCommented:
Sounds like you have a router that uses EIGRP, sending multicast updates into the network, and several workstations are trying to respond to join the multicast group, but can't.
Locate the router and set the EIGRP to make the local ethernet port a passive interface.
0
 
zekkerCommented:
I agree, its multicast....    your router is advertizing.
0
Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
dpimcadminAuthor Commented:
Thanks!  Is there a way to pinpoint which router?  The 224.0.0.10 isn't one of our network addresses.

0
 
lrmooreCommented:
How many Cisco routers do you have? If you have several, then perhaps they need the keep the eigrp moving. If you only have one on your local lan, that's the one.
224.0.0.0 is a universal multicast address range..
0
 
dpimcadminAuthor Commented:
OK.  Thanks.  We only have a few (5), is that too many to change the local ethernet port to a passive interface?
0
 
dpimcadminAuthor Commented:
OK.  Thanks.  We only have a few (5), is that too many to change the local ethernet port to a passive interface?
0
 
lrmooreCommented:
They probably need to communicate amongst themselves. If so, they cannot be passive. If this is the case, then the EIGRP traffic on the net is just something you're going to have to get used to as expected traffic, or start looking at VLAN's and create an independent backbone VLAN that carries this traffic independent of the rest of the network.
0
 
zekkerCommented:
I agree, they need to communicate amongst each other.
Separating them to VLANs is a way to do it or...

You could also put in an Access lists on the routers to only allow EIGRP and Multicast traffic to the other routers
Are you in responsible for the routers?  If not talk to the admin who is, this is fairly simple to do.

He would just need to out an outbound ACL in place on the nicks.  This would work fine, especially if you do not have a layer3 switch.  Making VlANS is fine, but you may need to route traffice between them.

0

Featured Post

Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now