?
Solved

Network Cable is Unplugged

Posted on 2003-03-27
8
Medium Priority
?
228 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-09
I have a Windows XP machine with two network cards installed. One network card goes into the cable modem the other network card is running out to my laptop which is a ibm thinkpad with a 3com pcmcia card installed via cross over cable. I have installed the latest drivers for both network cards, bought a crossover cable, checked the pinning of it, decided to make my own cable, made it and tried it but still the same problem. I have no link lights from either network card on the desktop or the laptop. I have tried turning off auto-nego. on both cards and tried them at all levels (10-half 10-full. etc without any luck. I have completely removed both cards in safe moved on both machines and reinstalled. I have also set the tcp ip on the desktop card to the ip of 192.168.0.1 and the laptop to 192.168.0.2 and both ping localhost. I plugged the cable modem in the second network card on the desktop and it worked, and it also worked on the laptop. PLEASE HELP!
0
Comment
Question by:arciles
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
8 Comments
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:dipersp
ID: 8222132
What's the objective here?  Are you trying to do ethernet without a hub?  While it can be done, you're better off going to the local computer store and buying a $40 hub or decent switch and save yourself time and aggrivation.  

If you really want to get fancy, get a 4 port broadband router.  Plug the cable modem into the wan port of the router, and plug the other two computers into the router as well.  That's it, setup IP addressing and you're done.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:mosleyit
ID: 8222205
Dumb question,  Have you tested both network cards on connections to the cable modem that you know is good?  Had to replace a network card in a system the other day for something similar.
0
 

Accepted Solution

by:
Count_Onnet earned 152 total points
ID: 8222210
No link lights on either machine when they're hooked up to each other, but link lights when they're connected to the modem. It sounds for all the world like it's not really a crossover cable.  The pinout should be (from left to right when looking at the bottom of the plug):

White/orange, Orange, White/green, Blue, White/blue, Green, White/brown, Brown.

On the other end, the orange and green will be reversed, and the white/orange and white/green will be reversed.

White/green, Green, White/orange, Blue, White/blue, Orange, White/brown, Brown.

A regular Cat-5 will have the same pinout on each end.  (It should be one of the pinouts described above.  Only pins 1,2,3, and 6 are used for carrying data, so the blues and browns are pretty much left out of the story.)

If I'm wrong, (stranger things have happened), but the two computers communicate fine with the modem individually, consider using a router.  You can use straight Cat-5 cables, which seem to work fine for you, and you eliminate other potential problems with internet connection sharing.

Good luck!
0
Microsoft Certification Exam 74-409

Veeam® is happy to provide the Microsoft community with a study guide prepared by MVP and MCT, Orin Thomas. This guide will take you through each of the exam objectives, helping you to prepare for and pass the examination.

 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:MCSE-2002
MCSE-2002 earned 148 total points
ID: 8228196
I bet your crossover cable is goofed. It seems like the only explanation.

I have made plenty of "expensive rope" while trying to make crossover cables.

try snipping both ends, and redoing them.

Good Luck!

Standard side

1. white orange
2. orange
3. white green
4. blue
5. white blue
6. green
7. white brown
8. brown

wacky, zany side

1. white green
2. green
3. white orange
4. white blue
5. blue
6. orange
7. white brown
8. brown


make sure when you put the caps on, the the nipple faces away from you,(the nipple is the little retaining clip)  and that wire 1 is on the left side.

Good luck!
0
 

Expert Comment

by:Count_Onnet
ID: 8232677
I'm curious about where we are on this one...is it a crossover cable?  Or are we looking for another answer?
0
 

Expert Comment

by:CleanupPing
ID: 9152839
arciles:
This old question needs to be finalized -- accept an answer, split points, or get a refund.  For information on your options, please click here-> http:/help/closing.jsp#1 
EXPERTS:
Post your closing recommendations!  No comment means you don't care.
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:juliancrawford
ID: 10088704
No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this TA.
I will leave the following recommendation for this question in the Cleanup topic area:

Split: Count_Onnet {http:#8222210} & MCSE-2002 {http:#8228196}

Please leave any comments here within the next seven days.
PLEASE DO NOT ACCEPT THIS COMMENT AS AN ANSWER!

Julian Crawford
EE Cleanup Volunteer
0

Featured Post

Moving data to the cloud? Find out if you’re ready

Before moving to the cloud, it is important to carefully define your db needs, plan for the migration & understand prod. environment. This wp explains how to define what you need from a cloud provider, plan for the migration & what putting a cloud solution into practice entails.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

If you’re involved with your company’s wide area network (WAN), you’ve probably heard about SD-WANs. They’re the “boy wonder” of networking, ostensibly allowing companies to replace expensive MPLS lines with low-cost Internet access. But, are they …
During and after that shift to cloud, one area that still poses a struggle for many organizations is what to do with their department file shares.
Here's a very brief overview of the methods PRTG Network Monitor (https://www.paessler.com/prtg) offers for monitoring bandwidth, to help you decide which methods you´d like to investigate in more detail.  The methods are covered in more detail in o…
Monitoring a network: why having a policy is the best policy? Michael Kulchisky, MCSE, MCSA, MCP, VTSP, VSP, CCSP outlines the enormous benefits of having a policy-based approach when monitoring medium and large networks. Software utilized in this v…
Suggested Courses

719 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question