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How can I set data compression in Solaris 9?

Posted on 2003-03-28
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
We have a SunFire V480 server running Solaris 9 (36GB HD) that has a external HP SureStore DAT tape drive attached.  The tape drive is DDS4; native 20GB capacity with 40GB compressed. We have exceeded the 20GB capacity.  

How can I set the data compression so I will be able to use all of the tape drive capacity?
I was told to change "/dev/rmt/1n" (1n is what we use now) to "/dev/rmt/1un" (ultra) but that did not work.  

Your help will be greatly appreciated!
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Question by:dee43
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soupdragon earned 1000 total points
ID: 8224052
Didn't work or didn't give you any compression? What backup utility are you using?

As I understand it the un (ultra compressed) and cn (compressed) devices are identical but try with /dev/rmt/1cbn just in case.

Check that your tape device is featured in the tape device config file /kernel/drv/st.conf. If the device is being picked up correctly then device type should show up in the /var/adm/messages file - and indeed if you call 'mt -f /dev/rmt/1cn status'.

Finally is there a significant amount of compressed data on the drive you are backing up (.Z, .zip etc. files)? If the data on disk is largely compressed (database_dumps.Z etc) then you won't get an awful lot of compression on the tape.

SD

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Expert Comment

by:Otetelisanu
ID: 8224115
/dev/rmt/1nc

n = not rewint

c = compression
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Expert Comment

by:yuzh
ID: 8224318
if you tape driver support compress (hardware compress) than you can use /dev/rmt/1nc as the above comments.

if you don't have a tape device with that capability you can, use "usfdump + compress + dd" to do the backup :

eg:

ufsdump 0f - /fs | compress | dd of=/dev/rmt/1n obs=20480

And the corresponding rstores would look like:
dd if=/dev/rmt/1n | compress -d | ufsrestore -

Or
use GNU tar with -z (compess option) to do the job, you can download GUN tar from:
http://www.sunfreeware.com/
 
use GNU tar:
If you used Gnu tar to back up whatever in mydir the with something like:

cd /path-to/mydir
tar cvzf /dev/rmt/1n .

then you would restore the data with:

cd /path-to/mydir
tar xvzpf /dev/rmt/1n











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Expert Comment

by:kencunningham
ID: 8224894
The /dev/rmt/1cbn device should do the job, but if you require any compressed files to be made smaller, I'd suggest getting a copy of gzip from www.sunfreeware.com and using that to compress your files. HTH.
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Author Comment

by:dee43
ID: 8226061
soupdragon,

dev/rmt/1cbn worked!  BTW, we are using ufsdump to do our backups. What does the "b" stand for and will I have to decompress files when I do a restore (ufsrestore)?


Thanks!
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Expert Comment

by:soupdragon
ID: 8226927
b stands for Berkeley-style device, leaving it off reverts to At&T-style as explained here:

When a file open for reading only is closed and the no-rewind bit is not set, the tape is rewound.  If the no-rewind bit is set, the behavior depends on the style mode.  For AT&T-style devices, the tape is positioned after the EOF following the data just read.  For Berkeley-style devices, the tape is not repositioned in any way.

You can leave the b off and it should still work. Some backup systems, like Legato, require the b option since they use record rather than file level repositioning.

Under normal circumstances the two modes seem pretty interchangable unless the application specifies otherwise.

SD
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