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Microsft Exchange 2000

Hi,

I've configured my server correctly, now the last thing remaining is the Exchange server 2000, how do i configure it so that i can mail extern and also recieve extern mail? Mail intern is working properly. i've a domain registered "mycompany.com"

Best regards
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Chronicles
Asked:
Chronicles
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1 Solution
 
nomispCommented:
You need to get your ISP to create a MX record for your domain. This will need to point to the external public IP address through which your exchange server connects to the internet.

Hope this helps.
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MSGeekCommented:
It's a good idea but you don't have to have an MX record, but you will need mail.mycompany.com for you to receive mail.  You should be able to send mail now resolving destination by DNS.
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nomispCommented:
MSGeek

I was under the impression that if you were not to use POP3 to collect your mail then you must have a MX record in order to forward mail to an individual host such as mail.mydomain.com. This would then resolve by DNS to an IP address of the server that collects the mail. Is this not right?

This is a snip from demon.net DNS data.
http://www.demon.net/external/

The MX (Mail eXchange) records control which hosts to send mail for this domain to. If there are no MX records, mail may only be used for sub-domains or individual hosts, or may not be used at all. For instance, there are no MX records for the domain ".com"

demon.net mail is handled (pri=20) by internal.mail.demon.net
demon.net mail is handled (pri=50) by relay-1.mail.demon.net
demon.net mail is handled (pri=50) by relay-2.mail.demon.net

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MSGeekCommented:
SMTP does not rely completely on MX records.  If it is a production environment I highly recommend establishing MX record as you previously stated.  SMTP can deliver messages and receive them without such records through DNS.

Good description of how SMTP works: http://www.ima.com/iems/smtp.html

nomisp... I do not disagree with anything you have said.  I just want to point out that it can be done, but your ISP may shut you down if you set it up without an MX record.  I am running an Excahnge server at home with no MX record and I can send mail all day long if I so choose.  To receive external mail you need at a minimum a registered FQDN such as mail.mydomain.com in addition to mydomain.com
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nomispCommented:
I'll do some reading up, thanks.
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ChroniclesAuthor Commented:
Thx for your replies all.
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MSGeekCommented:
nomisp, let me know what you uncover.  I do believe you are correct, I just established an MX record for myself.  It is a lot cleaner with one than without.  I believe doing so is the same as establishing mail.mydomain.com.
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nomispCommented:
Basically what i've found out is that if there is no MX record for the domain then most mailers will try to send the mail to the A record for the domain. Mail would arrive as long as the computer which the A record points to also handles the mail. If the exchange server is on a diferent IP address then you need a MX record.

Below is a link to another message board which describes it quite well.
http://archives.neohapsis.com/archives/openbsd/2002-08/0077.html
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MSGeekCommented:
That's what I was basing my feedback on and personal experience that I was able to get it to work.  The proper way is to establish an MX record as you stated.  I just think the more you understand SMTP the better off you are.  Thanks nomisp.  MSGeek.
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