?
Solved

Online game development courses

Posted on 2003-03-30
16
Medium Priority
?
793 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-04
hello

i am trying to find a place online where i can learn more about game programming and development
so I can better purchase the software and services needed to make a game I have in mind
0
Comment
Question by:Eaddy
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • +4
16 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:weelink
ID: 8237288
This is a very useful site:

http://www.gamedev.net/
0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:joachimc
ID: 8237928
0
 

Expert Comment

by:weelink
ID: 8245016
Is there a special programming language that you want to use?
0
Get MongoDB database support online, now!

At Percona’s web store you can order your MongoDB database support needs in minutes. No hassles, no fuss, just pick and click. Pay online with a credit card. Handle your MongoDB database support now!

 
LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:fl0yd
ID: 8246654
Whenever I read something about 'a game I have in mind' the first thing that pops to mine is: You need $$$, loads of it, really, you can't have enough money.

Secondly, it takes time, time, time, time, time... If you don't know what software you would need to write a game, you are in for a long and winding road, getting a rock-solid understanding of programming.

There are online tutorials as well as loads of books on the subject. None of which will be of great help, if you aren't proficient in programming yet. From the way your question is stated I would have to assume you aren't, otherwise you would know what software to use, or would be able to write your question in a more precise manner.

Sorry, if this sounds a bit harsh, but ideas are a dime a dozen. They are important, but everyone has them. What you need is a team, money, patience and money. Oh yeah, not to forget, you need money, too, and a team, plus patience.

.f
0
 
LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:fl0yd
ID: 8246675
Oh, and by the way, would you mind closing this question from about a year ago about the same subject? http://www.experts-exchange.com/Programming/Game_Development/3D_Programming/Q_20352301.html

.f
0
 

Expert Comment

by:Steven027
ID: 8247920
www.flipcode.com is an excellent resource for game development questions. There are quite a few links to tutorials, book reviews, and game developer sites.

I suggest you get a copy of visual studio .net.  Select either C# or C++, and get a supplemental book on that language.  Download the directx 9.0 sdk.

Andre LaMothe is series editor for a whole slew of game programming books that are very useful, especially for beginners.

Although the book is getting old, Tricks of the Windows Game programming gurus by Andre LaMothe might be a good jumping in point.

Good luck to you.
0
 
LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:fl0yd
ID: 8248483
C'mon, follow the link I posted above and see for yourselves that this thread isn't worth the time you're putting into. In this thread I took some time to illustrate the process involved in creating a game -- at length. Yet Eaddy never even felt the need to come back and close this question, or respond in any way. This was almost a year ago.

Thx for your time.

.f
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Eaddy
ID: 8249511
hey floyd how u doing long time no see, sorry about that question i forgot to accept it. But i did not forget what you said to me. i have it still in a text file on my comp
what i have been doing is taking care of the money part, that you made painfully clear in you last comment. since then i have been saving money to pay people for what i need . so far I have saved 25,000.00 but i know that is not enough but i still intend on trying to push on .i know what u say is true about it not being Easy but what the hey i still want to try and if it going to cost me .nothing in life is free.
i will still try my best

best regards Eaddy
PS that not harsh at all
Take Care!!1
0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:joachimc
ID: 8251268
I am running my own project and has been doing that for a long time.

Getting people to join and help out is a problem. Many people come and go. But as long as I stay in control over the code base it's not to much of a problem. The project is an RPG and it will probably take a very loooooooong time to finish but it is always moving slowly forward.

The single most important thing I think is to be of value to the project yourself. There are about a million posts of hey I have this great idea. You have to contribute a lot on the development side also if you are going to succeed.

It's always a good thing to do a small game first (though I skipped that one).

You can see how far we have gotten at wonderworld.thr3ddy.com
0
 

Expert Comment

by:weelink
ID: 8251533
For a DirectX tutorial see:

http://andypike.com

I'm currently trying this one and it is a very good tutorial
0
 
LVL 8

Accepted Solution

by:
fl0yd earned 375 total points
ID: 8252373
Finally, some action from Eaddy. Thanks a lot for taking care of that other thread. Sorry, if I stepped on your toes there and hope, that I haven't damaged your reputation. Your feedback is very welcome.

On to the money part: 25.000 (euro? USD?) really isn't all that much to start a project. If this is going to be a serious effort, it will be just about enough to pay the rent for your development studio for about 2 months. If you plan on doing a game without an office building, chances are that you will not succeed altogether. It is extremely important that team members are in close contact and do meet in person on a regular basis, daily would be great, but weekly will suffice if you are lucky and each and every member is highly responsible and shows a great deal of discipline.

I have to partially agree and disagree with joachimc here. If you are the project lead you absolutely need to be able to write your own engine as well as being able to judge the quality of artwork, be it visual resources or audio. So ideally you would combine the best of both worlds, but you will need more. In particular you need to have a strategic sense, be open-minded as well as rigid, unwilling to give in on those parts that would endanger the creation process [milestones, deadlines, ...]. You have to be able to plan well in advance plus being flexible enough to respond to changing circumstances. You do not have to be involved in the production process though, since you won't have time for that. Being the project lead is a full-time job. If it doesn't appear to be in your project, you are likely involved in a slowly failing effort. From my distant view I would assume that WonderWorld will eventually move into that direction. Although the design document is very detailed (a Good Thing(tm) ) in places it lacks one piece of information: target platform requirements. This in turn would impose a fixed plan with respect to milestones. [OT: Abstracting the render kernel to support both PC and XBoX isn't really a big deal -- they are both DirectX capable devices. The only thing that would need modifications is the texture management]. I doubt that it will ever go commercial or make money.

With all that offtopic squabbling I should get back to the original question. If you want to get a solid understanding about game development, online resources aren't the way to go. In general they present very specific techniques for solving a particular problem, but lack to transport a general outline. Books are a lot better in that respect. A rather complete overview can be found in "Game Architecture and Design" http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1576104257/ . Once you are familiar with those basics and want to get a thorough understanding of how to set up your render kernel, "3D Game Engine Design: A Practical Approach" http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1558605932/ is at the moment the most definate reference for that, approaching the topic from a rather abstract, theoretical point of view, based on mathemetical considerations alone, and leading to a full featured 3D render kernel. You would also need a solid understanding about physics and all those pitfalls involved in implementing a physics engine. I don't have any first-hand information on books, so I won't give you a vague recommondation here and leave it at that. If you have those basics installed, you may move on to more specific problem solving suggestions. A good place to look for is the "Game Programming Gems" series of books http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1584500492/ which are constantly updated (3 volumes at the moment) to deal with the most current changes as well as a lot of helpful basic tips and hints. Depending on the target platform you may need to do all the rendering, particularly the rasterizing, in software when it either isn't available in hardware or you choose not to use those hardware features for one reason or another. Although it is getting somewhat outdated, "Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice" http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0201848406/ is a great reference for a large number of algorithms you will need to get going. Apart from all that you do need a rock-solid understanding of the programming language you are planning to use, with c and c++ being most likely your best bets here. There are so many books out there, as well as great articles, that I will only state a few names of authors worth investigating. The most prominent ones being: Scott Meyers, Herb Sutter, Bruce Eckel, and Andrei Alexandrescu. This list is by no means complete and the fact that someone didn't appear in it is no hint to lack of quality.

I would like to make a few more suggestions, the foremost being: AIM LOW [not meant as yelling :-)]. It is no good to go for something that will never live to see the end of it and remains a citizen of dreamland. Choosing PC's as the target platform will make it hard to go by that. As an alternative: Have you thought about targetting for something like a GameBoy Advance? There are pros as well as cons to that decision: On the downside, you will need to get a deal with a publisher, since it is unlikely for you to produce cartridges yourself. This in turn will cause you to get ripped off. It will happen, no matter what, but it's better than failing altogether. The positive factors are: the hardware requirements actually force you to cut down the complexity. A good prerequisite to get closer to your goal. With this sort of lessened complexity involved, production cycles will drop dramatically, making it both easier to calculate the total amount of money involved as well as making it a lot cheaper. Depending on the deal with the [ficticious] publisher you made, you may get paid royalties based on sales figures. Since GBA titles need to be distributed on cartridges as opposed to CD's/DVD's the pirate-to-paying-customer ratio will be more friendly to you as the developer. Software will still get stolen, but the effects aren't anything to worry about.

Sorry for the long post. I hope it holds some viable information and gives you some ideas to think about. I wish you luck and hope to have helped you not wasting your hard earned money.

.f
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:krees
ID: 8287901
fl0yd:

do you worked in a game studio?
how do you know so much about this business?
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:krees
ID: 8287975
fl0yd:

do you worked in a game studio?
how do you know so much about this business?
0
 
LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:fl0yd
ID: 8290234
Yes, krees. I wouldn't say that I know much about it, though. Especially the business side of things has never really been anything I got interested in. I tend to call it the dark side, both because I cannot see through it as well as being the dirty part, run by shrewd individuals exclusively.

.f
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:krees
ID: 8293104
I see, and in which game(s) you worked on?

What was your role in the game?

Do you still think, after all that; an small in-house company can't create a good game?

I know what id did, but carmack's a genius :S

What do you think of the concept of garagegames?
0
 

Expert Comment

by:ennetworks
ID: 8612169
Hello developers,

              I share the same opinion with krees , I myself is interseted in carmack's works . I always wanted to develop a big thing and I always start with it and for a few days ... FORGET ABOUT IT...

              I think that there is alwasy a way to make something if we join work and gruop. I love making Games And game engines not for the money i get.. But for my love to 3D and GAMES..

              Never losse hope, you only need time and experince (that you can get easily). And I find out that money is not an important thing at all (For a garagegame group).

              What i mean is that is evey body have (or can get) Computers, Eveybody have (or can get freely) Programs like (3D Studio Max 5.0 , Maya 4.0 , Microsoft Visual Studio .NET , Any thing...) I myself have those programs (I got it easyily)   :)

               Ok... Now that we have - Computers - Software - Little experince :) - And Mainly HOPE and a grop all with no $$$ spent .. We only need to group ..

               As a start we neet to see eveybody's experince on programing, Secoundly we need the right language(I find C# the easiest and best for this project) . Third we need Some Artist for writing or drawing storys and graphics... This is not a problem belive me .. Coz users of the internet and computers are unlimited on this planet if we manage to make a group we can then have a name and place on the net so we can challange aritist and ask for a story .. (People like to challange..Freely).

               If anyone have an interest in this comment Please feel free to contact me (ennetws@hotmail.com)....

               And by the way ... I'am only 18 ..  I have a life time to develop   ;)

NEVER LOSE HOPE...  (bill gates,john carmack,all those genius ) didn't pay 25,000$ to start there projects .. they only needed a clear mind and some time and mainly ... An IDEA ....


-Ibrahim

PS: I'am working on a succusful 3D Game engine these days but i am on my last year in school so i need time to study not to develop..
0

Featured Post

What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Artificial Intelligence comes in many forms, and for game developers, Path-Finding is an important ability for making an NPC (Non-Playable Character) maneuver through terrain.  A* is a particularly easy way to approach it.  I’ll start with the algor…
Recently, in one of the tech-blogs I usually read, I saw a post about the best-selling video games through history. The first place in the list is for the classic, extremely addictive Tetris. Well, a long time ago, in a galaxy far far away, I was…
Sometimes it takes a new vantage point, apart from our everyday security practices, to truly see our Active Directory (AD) vulnerabilities. We get used to implementing the same techniques and checking the same areas for a breach. This pattern can re…
In this video, Percona Solutions Engineer Barrett Chambers discusses some of the basic syntax differences between MySQL and MongoDB. To learn more check out our webinar on MongoDB administration for MySQL DBA: https://www.percona.com/resources/we…
Suggested Courses

762 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question