?
Solved

file is slightly too big

Posted on 2003-03-31
16
Medium Priority
?
299 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-06
I've got an .avi that I want to put on a CD, but I'm about half a MB short on disk space. I don't care about that part, its just credits. The video editors I've tried like Ulead and something called fade to black are happy to cut off the last 20 seconds, but they can't resave without re-rendering the entire 2 hour movie (which will take about 6 hours on my modest hardware) and also can't compress as efficiently as the original file, so it grows in size anyway.

This might not be a graphics question. I just want to shave about 300 kb off the end and am perfectly happy if the file dies there. Is there any way to just copy the first 99.9% of a file?
0
Comment
Question by:xburba
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 6
  • 2
  • 2
  • +3
16 Comments
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:weed
ID: 8243096
Nope. And to put it bluntly, it sounds like you're copying copyrighted material.
0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:dearsina
ID: 8244099
Use overburn. Most newer CDRs allow you to burn over the set maximun limit of a CD, perfect for when you are a bit over, which sometimes (just for instance :-) DivX films are.
If you know your CDR is up for it, download a new version of your burn software and overburn away (it's reasonably safe).

sina
pirate to pirate
london
0
 

Expert Comment

by:modulo
ID: 8246978
Listening...

modulo

Community Support Moderator
Experts Exchange
0
New benefit for Premium Members - Upgrade now!

Ready to get started with anonymous questions today? It's easy! Learn more.

 

Author Comment

by:xburba
ID: 8247199
I am copying copyrighted material. But copyright only prevents me from redistributing without the owner's permission. If I purchase a book, I can certainly photocopy as often as I like (and probably share a few copies under fair use, but not so much as to personally profit or destroy the market) and if I have a legally acquired digital movie, I can certainly transfer to whatever media I deem appropriate. I could make a million physical copies if I wished and stick them in my attic, and watch a different one every day. I've merely purchased information and can do as I wish with it as long as it's just for me. No one's ever said you couldn't back up your copyrighted/trademarked computer programs that you legally purchased.

Copyright only protects the ideas, not the physical items. Otherwise, if I were a production company, I'd start using poor quality CDs that deteriorate quickly and force consumers to repurchase media (reference the clothing/sneaker industry).

xburba,
copyright/trademarks attorney, computer novice with CD burner that doesn't seem to "overburn"
(but I'm glad someone's "listening...")
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:weed
ID: 8247396
Actually no. If you ask someone who specializes in copyright law, making copies of a book is a violation of copyright and distributing that to friends is most certainly a violation. Movies are exactly the same, and since the movie's copyright doesn't belong to you, making a copy of it is a violation.
0
 
LVL 4

Accepted Solution

by:
dearsina earned 80 total points
ID: 8247883
That's a grey area 'weed'. Copyright law wasn't a problem back in the day when people recorded VHS copies of their favorite films that went on tv or copied a cd to listen in the car stereo, the problem started when people started distributing the copyrighted material on the internet and directly resulting in lost profit which really is key to the whole issue, so 'xburba' definetly has a point.

But these are one of those discussions that never end, like PC v Mac, or chicken v egg, so I suggest we focus on the matter on hand instead and take this outside to the nearest internet cafe or uni-bar.

For your question, take a look at the following avi-cutting guide:

http://www.divx-digest.com/articles/cutavi.html

sina
london



0
 

Expert Comment

by:vnueva
ID: 8250752
You're mistaken weed, the record industry and that Metallica guy have pushed the myth that it's selling you a physical object for years. You could always make cheap mixes back in the day. The industry never cared about that nor did they ever have protection. When mass redistribution hit they started putting "contracts" in small print on their packages saying that you as consumer wouldn't reproduce, just like those disclaimers on downloads which everyone ignores. Simple contract law pretty much voids these contracts because nobody reads nor is expected to read them, otherwise they'd start selling candybars that said in small print "by the way, you now promise to buy only our candybars." WYSIWYG applies, the economy isn't designed to have lawyers at every transaction, so the small print is usually void. It does protect the candybars when they have the ridiculous terms to their sweepstakes, because your expectation is buying candy, not the sweepstakes.

The record/tape/cd is protected by patent, Thomas Edison has that record patent long expired, and I'll assume cassettes are expired too. Some engineer somewhere made the CD. The entertainment industry has no claim here.

The info on the record is covered by copyright. You can't reinvent the CD yourself, and you can't claim creative rights for the media you buy (which would mean profit or redistribution). But you can use the info/data legally acquired however you wish. Once you buy a car you can tinker as you please, but you can't use the info you learn from buying the car to fabricate the same type of car and resell a new one, passing it off as your own idea.

As weed tells it, I couldn't even use Tivo or any hardware that first makes a copy of the info and then plays it. I couldn't play most computer games on CD because they usually install the info to my hard drive, and I've now "copied" it.

Not a copyright attorney, but once upon a time I did get an A in the class (I think I got a B in trademarks though)

 
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:weed
ID: 8250780
And who thinks xburba is trying to copy a video he obtained legally?..heh
0
 

Expert Comment

by:vnueva
ID: 8250865
I'm sure its illegal, but that point is moot. Weed might be using an illegal internet connection, but I can't assume that since he's on the internet that he's using an illegal connection, or that he's driving a stolen car because he's driving. Prove that xburba has illegally acquired material. Proving he wants to burn a CD with an unusually large file means nothing
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:weed
ID: 8250914
If it were a copy of a DVD it would be WAY too large to even contemplate putting on a CD. If it were a copy of a VCD it wouldnt be an avi and it would have already fit on a CD AND would have been burned as a device copy not from a file. Given that its got long credits on the end, so large in fact that they would make a difference in the movie size it's pretty obvious that its a commercial film, it's pretty obvious that this is a DivX encoded avi downloaded from the net.
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:Orestis
ID: 8254040
(weed)

You cab also encode Divx from DVD (backup) at home, you know....
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:weed
ID: 8254122
Obviously didnt because of "modest hardware" and his worry about re-rendering. Otherwise he'd have just re-ripped from the original DVD at a slightly lower rate.
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:Orestis
ID: 8254316
Can some moderator please evaluate if this question is legitime or not? i would like to post a suggestion on the original Question....

(no offence, weed, i understand your reasoning, i suppose it could be a question of copying copyrighted material, but the question as such is legitime, and i suppose there are some users who whould like to know how to cut an .avi short for legitime reasons)

0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:weed
ID: 8254446
The moderators are watching. This is definitely borderline because he hasn't outright said that he's copying information he shouldnt be but all the circumstances certainly point that way.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:modulo
ID: 8254677
Hi Orestis,

I'm listening in on the Q.
The "How to cut an .avi file" is a legitime question.
But as stated, knowledge can be used or misused.
Same goes for e.g. a hammer. You can use it for nails or to murder someone.

I'll leave it up to the consience of the experts to place a comment or not.

modulo

Community Support Moderator
Experts Exchange
0
 

Author Comment

by:xburba
ID: 8265525
That link worked, still inflates the total size, so I had to cut off more of the files than I wanted to. Sorry to cause so much trouble. As I've already been branded with a scarlet letter by both enemy and friend, I won't presume to either plead innocence or admit guilt.
0

Featured Post

[Webinar] How Hackers Steal Your Credentials

Do You Know How Hackers Steal Your Credentials? Join us and Skyport Systems to learn how hackers steal your credentials and why Active Directory must be secure to stop them.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Keep your audience engaged and get the most out of your next presentation with these quick Prezi tips.
Technology opened people to different means of presenting information, but PowerPoint remains to be above competition. Know why PPT still works today.
In this Micro Tutorial viewers will learn how to remove an unwanted object using Photoshop’s feature known as content-aware fill.
Learn the basics of inputting and editing your text components in Prezi. We will cover how to set styles, position, and group your text components. In your Prezi editor, click anywhere on the canvas to add text: A flashing cursor informs you that yo…
Suggested Courses

764 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question