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Required:  a bit shifting algorithm to convert a 16 bit color to a 36 bit one.

Posted on 2003-04-01
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Last Modified: 2010-04-15
I need an C algorithm that can convert a 16 bit color in R,G,B = 5,6,5 format to a 36 bit COLORREF of the format 0x00bbggrr.

Can anyone please help?  Let me know if my question isn't clear :)
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Question by:Dawkins
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25 Comments
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:burtdav
ID: 8244177
// generates 32-bit COLORREF
long rgb_to_colorref(int r, int g, int b) {
return (r + g<<2 + b<<4);
}
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Expert Comment

by:burtdav
ID: 8244190
// plus some brackets
long rgb_to_colorref(int r, int g, int b) {
return (r + (g<<2) + (b<<4));
}
0
 

Author Comment

by:Dawkins
ID: 8244230
Hi Burtday, I have a 16 bit value in 5,6,5 format rather than 3 nice RGB integers.  It's the converting the asymetrical 5,6,5 part that I'm having problems with.  I can think of a long winded way of doing it involving a 32 sized lookup array which matches to the nearest colour, but I'm sure there must be an elegant way.

So the function would be of the form:

uint32 16BitToCOLORREF(uint16 16BitColor)
{
  ...
}
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Expert Comment

by:burtdav
ID: 8244346
I don't understand 5,6,5 as an integer.
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:vamshi_pavan
ID: 8244376
mite be the function should be of the form
unsigned long 16bitto32(unsigned short)
{
do your coding in here
and then cast the result to an unsigned long
and return
}

printf the value returned by
printf("%x",...)//to display a unsigned decimal in hexa format
0
 

Author Comment

by:Dawkins
ID: 8244465
Hi Burtday, I have a 16 bit value in 5,6,5 format rather than 3 nice RGB integers.  It's the converting the asymetrical 5,6,5 part that I'm having problems with.  I can think of a long winded way of doing it involving a 32 sized lookup array which matches to the nearest colour, but I'm sure there must be an elegant way.

So the function would be of the form:

uint32 16BitToCOLORREF(uint16 16BitColor)
{
  ...
}
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:vamshi_pavan
ID: 8244467
dawkins
Firstly RGB(x,y,z)is a 24 bit color format because of the 3 parameters x,y,z which have to a minimum sizeof 1 byte(in which case they are chars) .They could be other integral datatypes.
So a 16 bit color format means it cannot be RGB its got be any two of the basic colors

And secondly do you want the exact algorithm that will combine the values you pass to a function like RGB(x,y,z) to generate the 2 power 24 color combinations or just any alogorithm that does the conversion of the format(typecasting) between 16 and 32 bits
0
 

Author Comment

by:Dawkins
ID: 8244482
woops it resent the last comment from me, ignore the post above! ^^

Let me explain the value that I have to start with and what I need to turn it into:  I have a 16 bit value, with 5 bits assigned to red, 6 bits to Green, and 5 bits to blue.  I need to convert this into a 32 bit COLORREF, with 8 spare bits, 8 for blue, 8 for green, 8 for red.
0
 
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Expert Comment

by:burtdav
ID: 8244528
(in^0x001F) + ((in^0x07E0)<<8) + ((in^0xF800)<<16)
0
 
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Expert Comment

by:burtdav
ID: 8244582
That masks the uint16 in into the 3 sections, shifting bits 0-4 (the high bits) left 16 bits, 5-10 left 8, and leaves 11-15 where they were... _that's not right, though_ it will map to distinct colors based on the correct r/g/b components (assuming the order is the same in the 2 structures?)

How important is speed? To spread it so black is black and white is white, you need to map the 5/6 bit numbers to 8 bits each: (out = in*8/5) or (out = (int)round((double)in*8/5)), depending.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Dawkins
ID: 8244636
No the order is inverted between the two structures.  The order is R,G,B in the 5,6,5 input.  In the COLORREF output it needs to be B,G,R.

Speed is important.  It has to do this per pixel :D
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:burtdav
ID: 8244682
For speed, these algorithms are biased towards black.
I'm not sure about whether promotion to 32bit int has to be forced here.
/* masks high 5 bits, shifts them right, then multiplies to fill 8 bits */
/* masks middle 6 bits, shifts them right, multiplies to fill 8 bits, then shifts left 8 bits */
/* masks low 5 bits, multiplies to fill 8 bits, shifts left 16 bits */
/* and adds those 3 values */
uint32 out = ((in^0xF800)>>11)*8/5 + (((in^0x07E0)>>5)*8/6<<8) + ((in^0x001F)*8/5<<16);

/* it might be more straightforward to use structs */

struct {
 b int: 5; /* first allocated = low bits */
 g int: 6;
 r int: 5;
} color_16;

uint32 out = (in.r*8/5) + (in.g*8/6 << 8) + (in.b*8/5 << 16);
0
 
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Expert Comment

by:burtdav
ID: 8244699
If in is a 16 bit integer, I think suffixing the hex masks with an L will cause promotion of the expression to long.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Dawkins
ID: 8244912
Don't think that works - I used that formula with the value:

uint16 in = 0;

and it gives me a return value of 3232817!

0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:vamshi_pavan
ID: 8245094
#include<stdio.h>
unsigned long _16to32(unsigned short);
void main()
{     unsigned short i=12;
     unsigned long k;
     k=_16to32(12);
}

unsigned long _16to32(unsigned short i)
{
unsigned long r,g,b,final;
r=g=b=final=0;
r=i&0x001f;
g=i&0x07e0;
b=i&0xf800;
final=final|r;
final=final<<8;
final=final|g;
final=final<<8;
final=final|b;
final=final<<8;
return final;
}
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:vamshi_pavan
ID: 8245117
hope the above code is some help to you
I have extracted the first 5bits(red)by bitwise AND then the next 6 bits(green) and then the last 5 bits(blue) into r,g,b;
and then pushed these values into a 32 bit unsigned integer
in the order, higher order 8bits(red) then green,then blue and last is zeroes and returned the 32bit value
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:burtdav
ID: 8245136
I'm a complete idiot. All the "^"s should be "&"s. And the silly "8/5"s should really just be shifts "<<(8-5)".

/* ok, it works this time... The 1st 3 terms move the bits to the high part of their new 32 bit home, the second 3 copy high bits of each color to the un-filled bits (red 12345 -> 12345123). If speed's an issue, the last 3 terms could concievably be left out for a 3.1% accuracy loss */
out = ((in&0xF800)>>8) + (((in&0x07E0)<<5)) + ((in&0x001F)<<19)
+ ((in&0xE000)>>13) + (((in&0x0600)>>1)) + ((in&0x001C)<<14);
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:vamshi_pavan
ID: 8245143
change the main() in the above code to this
#include<stdlib.h>
void main()
{     unsigned short i;
    unsigned long k;
    scanf("%d",&i);
if(i>64000&&i<0)
exit(1);
    k=_16to32(i);
printf("%d",k);
}
0
 
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Expert Comment

by:burtdav
ID: 8245174
My "+"s could be changed to "|"s, too... might lead to a slight performance gain (though I don't think so).
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:honey_hamster
ID: 8245981
The following should do it, and it should be clear what it's doing.

uint32 16BitToCOLORREF(uint16 16BitColor)
{
  uint32 bb;
  uint32 gg;
  uint32 rr;
 
  /* Get the 5-bit blue, 6-bit green, and 5-bit red values
   * from the 16-bit color */
  bb = 16BitColor & 0x1f;
  gg = (16BitColor >> 5) & 0x3f;
  rr = (16BitColor >> 11);

  return( (bb << 16) | (gg < 8) | (rr) );
}
 
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:burtdav
ID: 8246073
If you're using C++ or C99, you can make it an inline function to improve performance further (otherwise, maybe a macro's in order)

inline uint32 16BitToCOLORREF(uint16 in)
{
  return ((in & 0xF800) >> 8) | ((in & 0x07E0) << 5) | ((in & 0x001F) << 19)
    | ((in & 0xE000) >> 13) | ((in & 0x0600) >> 1)) | ((in & 0x001C) << 14);
}
/* or */
inline uint32 16BitToCOLORREF_cheap(uint16 in)
{
  return ((in & 0xF800) >> 8) | ((in & 0x07E0) << 5) | ((in & 0x001F) << 19);
}
0
 

Expert Comment

by:amir_0895
ID: 8248904
I would prepare a table of long, with a size of 2^16,
meaning a 64K*4=256K bytes.

Initialization would be something like this:
unsigned long *PrepareTable()
{
int i;
unsigned long *table;
table = malloc( (1<<16) * sizeof(unsigned long) );

for(  i = 0 ; i < (1<<16) ; i++ )
{
table[i] =
((i>>11)&0x1f))|((i<<3)&0x3f00)|((i<<16)&0x1f0000);
}

}

Convertion:
unsigned long Convert(unsigned short col)
{
return table[col];
}
0
 

Expert Comment

by:Terrance
ID: 8250846
Hi Dawkins,
The RGB stored in 2BYTE. Do u know how the int stored insight the memory?
0
 

Author Comment

by:Dawkins
ID: 8270920
Thanks guys,

I havent had a chance to try these solutions out.  I'm off on holiday for a week, but when Im back I will try them out and award the points to someone - thanks for the help!
0
 
LVL 5

Accepted Solution

by:
burtdav earned 2000 total points
ID: 8274357
I'd like to plug amir_0895's idea of a table, but I'd use my more complex algorithm (inline uint32 16BitToCOLORREF(uint16 in)) above to initialise each element - the extra cost isn't significant if it's once-off like that, and the added precision is a good thing.
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