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Slow LAN speed using Linksys DSL Router

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Last Modified: 2013-12-22
I have a home network hooked up using a 8-port Linksys DSL router. The network consists of one 2003 NT server, and 3 XP Pro workstations. All using Intel onboard LAN. All with at least 512MB RAM and 2Ghz processor. All computers report a 10/100 connection. The DLS router is the gateway and handles NAT, but the server handles DHCP.

Speed to Internet is great. Speed sharing files is not so great. Saving a text file to the server takes a couple seconds. At work I set up a very similar network and it saves in a fraction of a second.

I've installed a different 10/100 card in the server, but had the same performance. So my question is simply... Does the Linksys DSL router go slower than a typical switch? Would my LAN speed pick up if I plugged all the computers into a switch and then either used my server as a gateway using 2 NIC cards or simply bridged the switch and DSL router?

Thanks!
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Ok I took your comments and here are my results. I also increased the point value since now we're getting more into this.

a) Used a 4-port Linksys 10/100 switch to connect nothing but the server and 1 workstation together. It still responded at the same slugish speed.

b) Shared a drive on one workstation and accessed the same text file from a different workstation. Worked great. Definitely going the speed it should. So, I'm guessing it's something with how the server is set up.

c) Confirmed that the built-in firewall option is off for all computers. There is no chance of a virus as everything is a clean install from this last weekend.

d) Enabled NetBios over TCP/IP on all computers. It still responded at the same slugish speed.

e) Confirmed that the Computer Browser service was running on all computers.

f) Briefly reviewed the reference articles provided and I didn't see anything that appeared relevant.

So, since the only indicator thus far is pointing blame at the server I should probably tell you the server characteristics: I lied about the processor... it's a 1.7Ghz, 768MB RAM, 1 IDE 40Gig system drive, 2 IDE 80Gig data drives (mirrored and on a seperate SIIG controller card), it's running DHCP, DNS, and Active Directory.

Ok I've been doing some tests as I'm writing this... Since the data drives that contain the text files are mirrored drives using the SIIG controller card I decided to put a copy of the test text file on the plain ole system drive. Then I shared the root of the C drive to see if it was as sluggish. I opened the file in Dreamweaver MX like normal through My Network Places (since there wasn't a mapped drive yet to the new share) It worked great. So then I shared the root of the data drive. I then copied the test text file to the root of the data drive and shared that - also worked great. Next I tried files that I was originally had problems with. So then I played around with creating share and deleting shares while restarting my workstation, and it went both and slow, but I can’t come up with a definite reason why it would or wouldn’t work. No matter what I share or how I open a file, I can’t get a consistent good or bad connection. Could it be something with authentication? Tell me oh wise support gurus!
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First of all, I'm at work so I can't test the saving of the text file, but I can TermServ into the server and check some of the settings the past few comments have referred to.

a) Primarily I’m using mapped drives to the location of the text file. However, last night when I was playing around with the shares (as mentioned in my last comment) I used UNC paths. By UNC you mean \\server\testshare, right? Sorry never knew that acronym : ) Using both methods typically yields the sluggish response. However, when I was screwing around I could occasionally make both methods work as fast as they should. What did I do? I have no idea. I was creating shares, deleting shares, accessing them via a mapped drive or UNC, using different drives and using different subdirectories within the drive. No matter how many times I screw with it I can’t find the specific sequence that is the winning combination.

b) No I don’t see the QoS service installed on the server. You’re talking about the separate QoS Packet Scheduler service, right? Or is it some buried option somewhere? I have no idea what the workstations have. I’ll let you know tonight. If it’s left off by default, then it should be off for each computer.

c) About the security… I’m using Active Directory and all the workstations log into the domain nice and quick. So my novice opinion is that everything is authenticating, as it should. There is not a .bat file that runs each time I log in that remaps the path; rather, the computer just remembers the mapped drives. For the share settings on the server I’ve been using the “Authenticated Users” Group. Last night I added the “Everyone” group, but had the same poor response. In the event log I see nothing but successful audits, so from the surface it looks like everything is fine.

d) I’ve been pretty faithful about upgrading my Router software, but there was an update available. So I installed that. I’ll know tonight if it makes a difference.

e) I did set all of my NIC cards to 100Full before I reinstalled everything this last weekend and I was having the same sluggish response. Now that all the systems are new I forgot about the NIC speed. So, they are still on their default, which is auto. Because of your recommendation I’ll leave it. As mentioned in my previous comment, I did connect 2 workstations together and the LAN speed was great. However, I used the Linksys router and not a crossover connection.

f) I apologize for grouping LAN speed with WAN speed. I was only trying to demonstrate that the router, gateway, and DNS settings were all working as they should.

g) Tonight I will try the same tests via IP to factor out the name resolution as Jason mentioned.

By the way, is there any way to give even more points to the question? So many of you guys are helping me out. I feel bad splitting only 500 points!

Thanks for all your help,
Ken

Commented:
Just to add - double check the NIC speed settings. I can't emphasize this enough. It could also be that the mediocre switch in the Linksys is grinding to a halt because only one of the connected devices is at 100Full or something else. Older hub/switches used to be called 10/100, but the truth was if you connected anything at 10Mbps, then the whole hub had to run at 10Mbps.

If you were able to connect two devices to the switch and get reliable fast throughput, then just add a third device and test everything again between the first two and also to the third device. Add the fourth device and so on.

Good luck,
Jason

Author

Commented:
Thanks Jason, I'll make sure to triple check that this evening.
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So I’ve turned off all computers except for the server and one workstation. Then I performed the following:

a) Confirmed that NIC cards in both the server and workstation are set to Auto Detect.

b) Confirmed that the QoS service was not installed on either computer. Well, it was installed on the workstation. So I installed it on the server, restarted everything and got the same results. Then I unistalled it on both computers, restarted everything and also got the same slow results.

c) Disconnected the connection from the DSL modem to the Linksys Router – same results.

d) Mapped the same drive as I’ve tried before but my using the server IP instead of the server name – still had the same speed.

e) Tried something the opposite way… copied the test text file to the workstation, mapped the root of the C drive and then connected via UNC paths – worked great. Mapped the drive – worked great.

Again it sounds like a network setting purely wrong with the server. As a few of you mentioned DNS could be an issue. So… let me tell you about the network settings in detail.

Workstation (DHCP):
- IP: 192.168.1.100
- Subnet: 255.255.255.0
- Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1
- DHCP Server: 192.168.1.50
- Primary DNS Server: 192.168.1.50
- Secondary DNS Server: 192.168.1.1

Server:
- IP: 192.168.1.50
- Subnet: 255.255.255.0
- Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1
- DHCP Server: 192.168.1.50
- Primary DNS Server: 192.168.1.50
- Secondary DNS Server: 192.168.1.1

DNS is running on the server. There are 2 forward lookup zones: _msdcs.hq.graphicodyssey.com and hq.graphicodyssey.com in that order. There are no reverse lookup zones. In the DNS section of the Event Log there were only a few entries. There was one error from a few days ago and quite a few warnings. The warnings were all stating that there were too many IP’s that were facilitating DNS requests. So, I went into the properties for the DNS server and removed all IP’s except for the one that the workstations used (192.168.1.50). I still got the same results.

Okay I think I’m at the end of my road. I don’t know what else I could do. Help!

Author

Commented:
By the way, I also tried setting the workstation DNS to the IPs of some hosting company's DNS servers. (I think that's what johnb6767 was getting at) And that didn't seem to help. If you mean something else, let me know and I'll try that.

Commented:
If I remember my DNS correctly, no workstation will ever use 2 DNS servers at the same time. They will use the primary unless it isn't available.

Try a TRACERT to www.google.com and see how it's getting there. If it's going through your gateway without touching your server then I guess your DNS service isn't working properly.

Silly suggestion: try adding a HOSTS file to your workstations (winnt\system32\drivers\etc) with the server's name and IP address in it, and see if it makes a difference.

If you are using your server for DHCP, remove the secondary DNS entry from your workstations' DHCP scope (I'm assuming your server is configured with a static or reserved IP address with its DNS entries configured seperately).

Commented:
It sounds like you are not reproducing your statement about getting fast throughput with two devices connected to the switch. Connect them toegther with a crossover cable and try the same transfer. If you are using DHCP in the linksys you may have to assign static IP addresses. This way you can also try setting both NICs to 100full and test your speed. I can practically guarantee it will be fast. If you cannot get high throughput with a direct connection, then you know it is a problem with the server or workstation and not the linksys.

You would be better off just doing all your tests using ftp and ip addresses as long as you still suspect a network performance issue. Just forget about the DNS and file sharing until you feel comfortable you are relaibly getting good throughput.

Good luck,
Jason

Author

Commented:
Response to Jason-

I only have the slower speeds when accessing files located on the server from the workstation. I tried it in reverse (accessing the same file located on the workstation and accessing it from the server) and the speed was great. I also tried it just between two workstations and it worked great. So the router is working great and the NIC cards are too. So I'm guessing it's purely something wrong with my network settings. FYI, DHCP is handled by the server. NAT is handled by the Linksys Router.

Response to tstaddon-

When I get home this evening I'll play with the DNS and traceroute. I never thought about the host file... I'll give it a shot. Yes DHCP is hosted by the server and it defines the DNS and Gateway. DHCP is from 192.168.1.100-200. The server has a static IP and DNS settings (listed above).
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"By the way, I also tried setting the workstation DNS to the IPs of some hosting company's DNS servers. (I think that's what johnb6767 was getting at) And that didn't seem to help. If you mean something else, let me know and I'll try that. "

Actually what I was getting to was using the internal DNS server, built in to 2000 server.Configure it to forward all requests out to the ISP's DNS, and statically set the DNS on the XP systems, to that of the internal DNS server.

Not sure if that is what you tried or not....Just wanted to clarify...

Commented:
it is a small network
why not just set everything to static IP, set the DNS manually for your ISP's DNS servers or some other DNS  and manually set the gateway as the router

seems a lot less trouble than the time you've put into troubleshooting this

Author

Commented:
Yeah I know this is a lot of work for something that is overkill for a home network, but I love it. It's a lot of fun. There's nothing more gratifying than getting something like this to work after hours upon hours of testing. Thanks for bearing with me.

John-
I'm not sure I exactly know what you mean... Right now if I run "ipconfig /all" on a workstation you're saying it should only return 192.168.1.50 (the server) as the primary DNS server, right? That's what I currently have. However, the primary DNS of 192.168.1.50 is automatically set by DHCP. I think at one point I set it statically and it didn't make a difference. Then in the DNS properties on the server it should forward all DNS requests to the ISP? Currently I have all requests forwarding to the Linksys router. I'll try playing with that later.

Author

Commented:
Well, after screwing around with it ALL freakin weekend I found out that I only get the problem when Active Directory is installed. Without AD everything runs great. For the life of me I can't figure out what it is about AD that screws it up. I'm guessing something with DNS. Nevertheless, I give up! Thank you to everybody for your help. I really appreciate it.

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