Modify Win2000 boot menu

How to add FreeBSD operating system to Windows 2000 boot menu?
As Windows display FreeBSD is on G: drive :-)
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Lukasz LachAsked:
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Rob StoneCommented:
How can I use the NT loader to boot FreeBSD?
The general idea is that you copy the first sector of your native root FreeBSD or Linux partition into a file in the DOS/NT partition. Assuming you name that file something like c:\bootsect.bsd or c:\bootsect.lnx (inspired by c:\bootsect.dos) you can then edit the c:\boot.ini file to come up with something like this:

            [boot loader]
            timeout=30
            default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
            [operating systems]
            multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows NT"
            C:\BOOTSECT.BSD="FreeBSD"
            C:\BOOTSECT.LNX="Linux"
            C:\="DOS"
         

This procedure assumes that DOS, NT, Linux, FreeBSD, or whatever have been installed into their respective fdisk partitions on the same disk. In my case DOS & NT are in the first fdisk partition, FreeBSD in the second, and Linux in the third. I also installed FreeBSD and Linux to boot from their native partitions, not the disk MBR, and without delay.

Mount a DOS-formatted floppy (if you've converted to NTFS) or the FAT partition, under, say, /mnt.

In FreeBSD:

            dd if=/dev/rsd0a of=/mnt/bootsect.bsd bs=512 count=1
         


In Linux:

            dd if=/dev/sda2 of=/mnt/bootsect.lnx bs=512 count=1
         


Reboot into DOS or NT. NTFS users copy the bootsect.bsd and/or the bootsect.lnx file from the floppy to C:\. Modify the attributes (permissions) on boot.ini with:


            attrib -s -r c:\boot.ini
         


Edit to add the appropriate entries from the example boot.ini above, and restore the attributes:


            attrib -r -s c:\boot.ini
         


If FreeBSD or Linux are booting from the MBR, restore it with the DOS ``fdisk /mbr'' command after you reconfigure them to boot from their native partitions.


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Lukasz LachAuthor Commented:
I have no boot.ini file ;-/
It's Windows 2000 Professional.
Rob StoneCommented:
You will have one on Windows 2000 Professional but it may be hiding.

Do a search for it including hidden files.  It resides on the root of C:\

If you are looking through explorer make sure you can view all hidden files and show hidden system files (under tools> folder options)

The boot.ini file is read only so you will need to make it writable first.
marnaertCommented:
If you don't have one, create it by copying into a text format :

[boot loader]
           timeout=30
           default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
           [operating systems]
           multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows NT"
           C:\BOOTSECT.BSD="FreeBSD"
           C:\BOOTSECT.LNX="Linux"
           C:\="DOS"

that stoner79 gives !
Lukasz LachAuthor Commented:
thank you
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Windows 2000

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