NT Server 4.0 VS WIN2000 Server Access Rights

Hello, We run a NT platform network. We have several newer servers running on this network and they are running WIN2K Server and 2 older machines still running NT Server 4.0. We still have "ol' bessy" as the PDC running NT Server 4.0 sp 6.0a. This has not been an issue until now. I would like to move some personal user files from one of the NT servers to one of the win2k machines. The problem is that when I move these folders and re-apply the securities the users cannot access them. The users are running win2k pro and I have them set-up in their local machine domains as it is easier so they can install and uninstall programs as they wish as admins in their domain. I have made the local machine domains part of the domain on the PDC. Why will NT server let these users access the files but not win2k server? I know, (at least think), that it has to do with letting the users be in their local domains but it stumps me why NT does not have an isse with it.
Thanks,
Dave
kasdasAsked:
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WiiredCommented:
You say that the files cannot be accessed after you reset the permissions, correct? Have you tried to access them before setting permissions? (just to make sure). If you can access them, try setting permissions one at a time to see when you lose the ability to connect to the files. I had an issue similar to this that was resolved by adding the user accounts to the 2k server. Do you plan on removing the NT4 PDC from this scenario in the near future, or are you keeping it for good? As I have had many issues with an NT4 PDC on an otherwise Win2000 network with Win2k Servers as well, I found that the easiest way to make everything finaly behave was to remove the NT4 Machine. Just a thought...
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scraig84Commented:
Are you using the old tried and true method of access?

Users into Global group
Global group into local group
local group given permissions to resources.

Also, have you had these users logout and log back in?  This is always necessary when there has been a change in permissions.
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tchamtiehCommented:
When you say "I have made the local machine domains part of the domain on the PDC" I hope you meant you joined the local machine to the PDC and added the user to the local "Administrators" group (this will allow them to do anything they want on the local machine). Also the Win2K servers should be part of the domain as well. Once you reset the permission on the files you moved to give the DOMAIN\USER access to the files then it should work just fine, they will have total access to their files. I would say, re-check the permission on the files you moved to the Win2K server and make sure the DOMAIN\USER has full access to his/her files, not that it should be DOMAIN\USER and not LOCALMACHINE\USER.

I concur with Wiired, you should eventually move to a pure Windows 2000 environment, much easier to manage.
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kasdasAuthor Commented:
Thanks
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