MAC address

Here is the situation: A friend of mine uses cable internet. His provider restricts it to only one MAC address. He wants to connect a second computer to the internet, using second NIC and his machine as a router/gateway. The question is if the provider can find out that a second computer is attached /coz they'll cut him off if they find out/. Are the MAC addresses or the original IP preserved in the IP packet?
mitttkoAsked:
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qwaleteeCommented:
No, they generally are not at the lower levels of traffic.  Only the IP addess remains in the header, and if your friend's computer is using ICS to share the connection, it will use NAT to translat the address back out to the "public address."

Your friend should use a SOHO gateway (D-Link, Linksys) for this.  It works much better, does not require the "main" PC to remain on, and is pretty typical even for a single PC setup, since it provides extra security to the computer.

I don't know many cable companies that still restrict you to one PC, though.  Sounds like this place sucks!

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WiiredCommented:
When you have an ISP that restricts to a single MAC address, follow qwaletee's recommendation, get a linksys router, and use the "Clone Mac Address" option in the advanced properties. This way, the ISP gets the MAC of the router, not your NIC.
mitttkoAuthor Commented:
aha, sucks

is the destination of the packets recognized only by ports?
and what about the internal-net MACs? can the me "seen" from the provider?
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mitttkoAuthor Commented:
to Wiired
are there any other soho /cheap/ routers around that do that trick? d-link?
mitttkoAuthor Commented:
can THEY BE "seen"...
mitttkoAuthor Commented:
<<No, they generally are not at the lower levels of traffic>>
just got that
understood
WiiredCommented:
Most Dlink's also have the Clone MAC address feature, but Iam not sure of any others off hand.
WiiredCommented:
Price wise, between the Linksys and the Dlink...depends who is on sale. :-)
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