• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 211
  • Last Modified:

Windows 2003 Migration Question - Easy

Will divide points among the most helpful.

Right now we are a mixed NetWare/Windows 2000 shop.  My boss would like me to consider moving everything to 2003.  I need some advice.

Current config:
1 Exchange 2000 server running on Windows 2000 Server.
1 Citrix MetaFrame 1.8a server running on Windows 2000 Advanced Server.
1 IIS server running Windows 2003 Server.
1 NetWare 6.0 Server being used for file and print.  Supports 280 users and 1TB of disk space.
1 NetWare 6.0 Server being used for file (IT Dept) and DHCP.

The Exchange server will soon be upgraded to Exchange 2003 on Windows 2000.
The Citrix MetaFrame server will soon be upgraded to MetaFrame XPe and Windows 2003.
The IT Dept files can be combined with the primary file server.

My question is how many servers should I end up with if I move everything to 2003 and what services should each server provide (authentication, file, print, etc...)?

0
lpenrod
Asked:
lpenrod
1 Solution
 
DRRYAN3Commented:
Exchange 2003 becomes much more dependant on MS Active Directory.  AD requires DNS.

At a minimum, you're probably looking at a decent, new machine to become your primary Active Directory controller server.  I've seen recommendations with your number of users that this machine be dedicated to that purpose.

You'll most likely need another server for DNS and DHCP and WINS functions.  And another acting as a second AD controller.

Netware (IMHO) could always handle many more users than Windows on a given server.  You may want to consider splitting your file and print functions across servers.

You'll still need the server for Exchange, the server for Citrix, the server for IIS.

That makes 7 or 8 servers

1 - AD
2 - DNS / DHCP / WINS
3 - AD
4 - Exchange
5 - Citrix
6 - IIS
7 - File (or File/Print)
8 - Print (or File/Print)
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Cloud Class® Course: Certified Penetration Testing

This CPTE Certified Penetration Testing Engineer course covers everything you need to know about becoming a Certified Penetration Testing Engineer. Career Path: Professional roles include Ethical Hackers, Security Consultants, System Administrators, and Chief Security Officers.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now