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What are the equivalent to FAT, FAT32 for UNIX and Linux ???

Posted on 2003-10-21
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Hi

FAT16, 32 and NTFS are for Windows what about Ubix and Linux. What are the FILE SYSTEM for UNIX and Linux?

Thanks

Aja
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Question by:aja101498
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brettmjohnson earned 50 total points
ID: 9595940
There are several different file systems available for Unix and Linux

UFS
FFS
HPFS
EXT2, EXT3
JFS
XFS
ReiserFS
HFS+

http://www.infoanarchy.org/wiki/wiki.pl?Filesystems
http://www.wagoneers.com/UNIX/City-U/file-systems.html
http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Filesystems-HOWTO.html
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by:glassd
ID: 9597576
Most Unix implementations have their own file system formats. Some are better than others for certain tasks. They all work slightly differently, but most are much more efficient than NTFS.

In addition there are a number of third party file system formats which can be used on different Unix flavours. One important third party filesystem missing from the list above is VXFS from Veritas.

Others to add are:
EFS   (Old Irix file system form Silicon Graphics, superseded by XFS)
CXFS (Clustered version of XFS, again Irix)
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by:gheist
ID: 9601847
And main thing - there is no 2G limit for 5-10 years depending on unix system you choose, and every file system supports granular access controls.
and there are networked file systems like AFS (see www.openafs.org), NFS, and SMB (one you call "Network Share")
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by:Hanno Schröder
ID: 9626786
You're missing the CD ROM filesystems ISO (isofs, iso9660, hsfs and so on) and the
different PC filesystems (like dosfs, dos, pcfs etc.) and many more "pseudo" filesystems like swapfs, procfs, tempfs, doorfs, namefs, cachefs ...
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by:GeneriK
ID: 9657862
devfs in Linux 2.4.x
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by:Hanno Schröder
ID: 9658314
devfs in any UNIX System V.4 (as Solaris), too -- I just missed it :-(
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by:GeneriK
ID: 9658437
nubfs
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