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IPSec VPN connection from behind a PAT firewall?

Posted on 2003-10-22
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Last Modified: 2008-03-10
Hi folks,

I know that I cannot create a outbound PPTP-based VPN connection from behind my PAT firewall (Cisco PIX) without creating static mappings between the internal (private) and an external (public) address. Obviously this isn't feasible, since I would need to have a separate public address for everyone who needs/wants to make an outbound VPN connection, and I'd need to setup static mappings for each address.

However; can anyone confirm or deny whether this is possible when using IPSec to create the firewall connection?

Basically, I would like to have a way to allow people from behind my firewall to make a VPN connection to another office, ideally without 1-1 address mapping. I don't want to have a LAN-LAN VPN tunnel, I want it PC-LAN.

Thanks!
JP
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Question by:JammyPak
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by:_nn_
ID: 9598957
I don't see how. IPSec needs UDP 500 and IP proto 50/51. In a sense, it's "IP-in-IP", so AFAIK, it can't work through a PAT.
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t1n0m3n earned 500 total points
ID: 9621266
Yes I use IPSec through NAT all the time.

The trick is to enable the "IPSEC over TCP" setting in the client that you are using, and make sure that it is enabled on the other side as well.
You can also use UDP instead of TCP.

Basically, the protocol 50 (and 51 if you are using AH) will get encapsulated in a TCP packet and look like normal TCP/IP traffic to the NAT device.

I have many contractors that use this type of connectivity today.
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by:t1n0m3n
ID: 9621269
BTW the default TCP port for IPSec over TCP is port 10000.
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by:t1n0m3n
ID: 9621274
Basically, the protocol 50 (and 51 if you are using AH) will get encapsulated in a TCP packet and look like normal TCP/IP traffic to the NAT device.

NAT should read PAT
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by:JammyPak
ID: 9629432
Hi folks, thanks for the responses.

t1n0m3n, I'll try this out and let you know how it goes!
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by:JammyPak
ID: 9653739
Seems to work great - thanks!
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