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Subnet ending in 248 for Private IP range of 192.168 will Allow what number of hosts?

Posted on 2003-10-23
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Last Modified: 2012-05-04

Normally, we setup routers dhcp with a private IP on the LAN and a subnet of 255.255.255.0 and gateway of 1.1

If the subnet was changed to 255.255.255.248, what would happen?

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Question by:gizmoadria
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by:scraig84
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You would have 6 usuable addresses - including the gateway.  So 5 devices aside from the router.
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by:vtobusman
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 You will only be able to have 6 computers on your network one being the gateway so 5 usable pc's
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by:gizmoadria
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So, if there were 6 computers at the site and they had intermittetent problems of one pc being kicked off


-the ones that stayed on were fine but the ones that were shut off could not get DNS but
-Local LAN printing worked somewhat
-We looked for virus, spyware, network protocols

How many computer can be attached to a gateway with a subnet of 255.255.255.0
or
What would have been a better octect to change the subnet to?
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vtobusman earned 70 total points
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255.255.255.0 Will support 254 clients
one being the gateway so aprex 253 hosts ( PC's )

um if you have 6 pc's you can you 240 for a subnet
255.255.255.240
wich will leave room for 14 usable addresses 1 gateway and 13 PC's

  What are you tring to do so that i may have a better idea of what to tell you ??
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by:Dovinshka
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Is this anything to do with an ISP assigned subnet?
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by:jlindq
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For quickly figuring out how many usable adresses there are on a given subnet with mask 255.255.255.X (where X is 0, 128, 192 .. 252) take 256-X.
This is the number of adresses in the network. Out of these, one (the lowest) is the "network adress", one (the highest) is the "broadcast adress". Typically uoi'll want to stick a router in there as well, which will use a third adress. The rest can be used for regular machines.

So, for some examples:
255.255.255.0 (or /24 with the short notation) has 256 adresses, and you can stick one router and 253 machines on it, totalling 254 usable adresses.
255.255.255.224 (ie /26) has 32  adresses, where you can use 30 of them (for router or other machines)
255.255.255.252 (/30) has 256-252 = 4 adresses. Minus one for the network and one for broadcast. This leaves you with two usable adresses. This setup is sometimes used between two routers where there are only two endpoints on the network.

Sometimes the mask 255.255.255.255 (/32) is used to denote a single server (256-255 = 1). This is not really a network, just one IP adress.
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by:gizmoadria
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vtobusman,

We had a site where computers weren't able to stay online and come to find out the router had a subnet ending in 248 rather than the standard .0 so I'm here at experts-exchange to figure out why someone would change the subnet.

It looks like 240 would have been more apropriate.

Thanks All!
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by:vtobusman
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Glad to be of help
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