Placement of default statement

In the following code:


switch (someVar)
{
     case 1:
    {
        //
        break;
    }
    default:
    {
        //
        break;
    }
    case 2:
    {
          //
          break:
     }

will case 2 ever execute, or would the default statement catch the program flow beforehand?
LVL 1
mattjsimpsAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

AxterCommented:
case 2 will execute if the variable is equal to two, regardless of the location of the default
0
mattjsimpsAuthor Commented:
I thought that was the case....Code reviewer doesn't believe me though. Anyone else?
0
AxterCommented:
All you have to do is run a small test to prove it:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
      cout << "Hello World!" << endl;

      int x;
      cin >> x;

      switch(x)
      {
      case 1:
            printf("1\n");
            break;
      default:
            printf("d\n");
            break;
      case 2:
            printf("2\n");
            break;
      }
      
      system("pause");
      return 0;
}

0
AxterCommented:
If you're reviewer does not believe the out come of a test result, then tell him to read the C++ standard which states the following:

ISO/IEC 14882:1998(E)
Sections 6.4.2  (Pargraph 5 and 6)

5 When the switch statement is executed, its condition is evaluated and compared with each case constant.
If one of the case constants is equal to the value of the condition, control is passed to the statement following
the matched case label. If no case constant matches the condition, and if there is a default label,
control passes to the statement labeled by the default label. If no case matches and if there is no default
then none of the statements in the switch is executed.

6 case and default labels in themselves do not alter the flow of control, which continues unimpeded
across such labels. To exit from a switch, see break, 6.6.1. [Note: usually, the substatement that is the
subject of a switch is compound and case and default labels appear on the toplevel
statements contained
within the (compound) substatement, but this is not required. Declarations can appear in the substatement
of a switchstatement.
]
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
mattjsimpsAuthor Commented:
Unfortunatly, some of our servers are down, and i cant get onto a target to run some test code. I also figure, if i ask a dumb question like this here, i get some nice person posting the relavent section of the standard.

;-)
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
C++

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.