Poor quality scanned photos

Hello!

I have recently returned from a trip to Europe, and just finished scanning in some pictures.  Unfortunately, there were two recurring problems with the images:
Grainy (due to poor light exposure / High ISO) http://www.student.cs.uwaterloo.ca/~ctheiss/0133.jpg
Blurry (due to camera moving while picture was being taken, or poor light exposure) http://www.student.cs.uwaterloo.ca/~ctheiss/0095.jpg

Admittedly, I'm not a very good photographer, but I'm hoping there's some way to fix these pictures digitally.  I'm using Paint Shop Pro.  Edge-preserving smooth and Sharpen are the respective solutions (AFAIK), but neither makes the pictures look really good.

What can I do to save my pictures?
LVL 1
CoreyTheissAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

weedCommented:
Not much you can do to fix a REALLY bad photo but the best you can do is something like Photoshop's Unsharp Mask. For the gritty ones you might apply a SMALL gaussian blur first.
0
snapdragon030500Commented:
I agree with weed - slight gaussian blur if you can get into Photoshop.  Specifically, for the crowd scene above:  then actually reducing the visual image size will reduce graininess to a certain extent.  Once the size is reduced, you can play with a slight Unsharp Mask to get some sharpness back, but it's a fine line because the grains want to come back, too.  You can get something acceptable "enough" for most of the image, then use your blur brush tool to get the graininess out of individual areas where you can't stand it.

It's a great cheat for lots of bad images - blur, reduce, unsharp mask.  But I agree with what weed said about bad photos.  All you can do is all you can do!

Basic recipe often good for Unsharp Mask at web resolution:
Amount:  150%
Radius:  .5 pixels
Threshold:  4 levels
Adjust from there.  Watch out for "glowing edges" around details.  History brush comes in very handy on details for this reason.  Can expound if you're interested.  Don't think you need it on either of these two images.

For your image of the altar with all the skulls:
I had some luck with a harsher Unsharp Mask, then lowered the res to lower the image size on screen (dubious if printing), then did another Unsharp Mask.  Looked better, but it depends on what you can live with.  It's a pretty blurry shot.  But cool.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
CoreyTheissAuthor Commented:
Thanks :)  It doesn't look too bad, and if that's the best I can do, then I have to live with it.  Thanks for your help!
0
snapdragon030500Commented:
You're welcome.  It helps that these shots are relatively large visual size to begin with.  Gives you room to shrink them.  Too bad you can't just go back to Europe and take them again!  ;-)
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Web Development

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.