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File handling in C++ on Linux/Unix platform

Posted on 2003-10-24
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Hi everyone,

I have a bunch of file handling code that I am writing in VC++ 6.0. I am mostly using the methods defined in <io.h> such as _finddata_t structure , _chdir(), rename(), _getcwd() and alike. At sime point it might be necessary to compile the application I am coding on a Linux platform. I don't think these methods are unix compatible. I don't have any experience coding on a linux/unix platform. I need to know if there are any file handling modules that can be compatible on both platforms or a way to make minimal changes to the existing code which makes it possible to compile it on a linux platform.

Any suggestions or reference to a resource(online, books,...) is appreciated.

onlyshiza
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Question by:onlyshiza
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6 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:GaryFx
ID: 9615245
For the I/O itself, try sticking with the C++ library, specifically iostream and related classes.

Unfortunately, these don't address directory issues.  

Gary
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by:onlyshiza
ID: 9615317
well,  it's mostly directory manipulation like finding the name of the current directory, file names in a directory or renaming/ deleting/ saving a file.
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Accepted Solution

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Axter earned 320 total points
ID: 9615734
Most of the directory functions are available in Linux/UNIX.
However, you should remove the leading underscore when you use it in your code.

So use chdir() instead of _chdir().

chdir() will compile in Windows and Linux/UNIX, but _chdir() does not compile on Linux/UNIX.

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Author Comment

by:onlyshiza
ID: 9615749
thanks Axter. How about the _finddata_t structure. Is this also supported on Linux/UNIX or is there any similar structure?
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Expert Comment

by:Axter
ID: 9615901
Unfortunately, the find directory logic is not the same.  Most Linux/UNIX platforms use the type of find directory functions used in the Bordland compiler.

You'll find other directory functions like chdir, mkdir, rmdir, etc..
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Assisted Solution

by:dhyanesh
dhyanesh earned 160 total points
ID: 9616148
hi

info libc

Enter this at command prompt in linux for complete documentation of all available functions.

There are sub-topics for file handling and I/O.

Dhyanesh
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