migrating from c++

we have a fairly sizeable application (3 million + lines of code) in C++ / win32 api compiled into a single exe.  We also have several of our own custom and 3rd party libraries and dll's mixed in.  There are many features of c# that we would like to take advantage of.  Is this possible without rewriting our entire application (something that is not going to happen)?  
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marvinmAsked:
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SRigneyCommented:
Well, C# does have the ability to create .dlls that are compatible with COM, if you are looking to rewrite some of the external .dlls then you can probably do that in c#, and would have to change some references to point to the new C# ones.

I don't think that it's usercontrols would interact very nicely with the existing C++ code, and I doubt that you can write subsets of your GUI in C#.  But you probably can use it for backend work if you like.

I'm not the end-all be-all resource on it, though, so don't take it as an absolute negative.
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_TAD_Commented:


I guess it depends on what C# functionality you want to take advantage of.

I suppose you could create C# dlls and then have your C++ program use them, but I don't know of any functionality in C# that can't be done in C++.  With the exception of Garbage collection, but .Net garbage collection only works on managed code (code written in a .Net language), garbage collection does NOT work on unmanaged code (code written in anything other than a .net language).


What kinds of functionality do you want to take advantage of?
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