• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 291
  • Last Modified:

Wireless networking question

I have a office computer that I use a lot, I want to put another computer out in my shop area (same building) and be able to access files between the 2. Can I do this with just a couple of wireless cards or do I have to have a router? I use dialup in the office could I just access that connection through the office machine?
Thanks
Don
0
rdonchann
Asked:
rdonchann
1 Solution
 
JonybrvCommented:
You can do this with a couple of wireless cards and with a Ad-Hoc wireless network connection.

Check out here some information about that:

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/columns/bowman/02april08.asp
0
 
JonybrvCommented:
.. and the the Range should be not more than 150 feet.
0
 
flanqueCommented:
Hello,

You have a couple of options here. Firstly to answer your dial-up question, yes you can access the dialup from the shop machine even though it is dialed up from your office machine, but more on that in a minute...

You would want to get two wireless access points, such as the DLINK 900+ AP, and set them up in bridged mode. This allows you to set it up so that only the two wireless access points can communicate and nothing else in between can. The DLINK 900+ AP are not expensive, and also offer the feature of acting as a central access point if you wish to add say a third computer to your wireless network. This option does however require a network card in both your office computer and your shop computer, but they are like $10 each.

Really all you need to do if you choose this option is:

 1. Set up the office computer with the IP of 192.168.0.1 and a netmask of 255.255.255.0.
 2. Set up the wireless access point for your office computer with the IP 192.168.0.2, a netmask of 255.255.255.0 and a gateway of 192.168.0.1.
 3. Set up the wireless access point for your shop computer with an IP of 192.168.0.3, a netmask of 255.255.255.0 and a gateway of 192.168.0.1.
 4. Set up the shop computer with an IP of 192.168.0.4, a netmask of 255.255.255.0 and a gateway of 192.168.0.1.
 5. In the properties for the office computer's wireless point, give it a SSID of DEFAULT and an AP name of OFFICEAP.
 6. In the properties for the shop computer's wireless point, give it a SSID of DEFAULT and an AP name of SHOPAP.
 7. In the wireless properties for the office computer's wireless point, set it to bridge mode and enter in the MAC address of the shop computer's wireless point (this is found on the serial sticker on the underside the wireless point).
 8. In the wireless properties for the office computer's wireless point, set it to bridge mode and enter in the MAC address of the office computer's wireless point (this is found on the serial sticker on the underside the wireless point).
 9. In the wireless properties for both the computer's wireless point, set the channel to be the same. This is like a frequency in which they both listen on to communicate. If the first one doesn't work try another as someone else in the close proximity might be already using this channel.

By this time you should be able to ping and see the shop computer over the wireless connection.

You can make it more secure (and I strongly recommend you DO) by entering in a WEP encryption key on both access points. This key needs to be IDENTICAL for the wireless network to work. The bigger the key (256-bit probably the minimum) the better.

Once this is working, you then go into the office computer and enable Internet Connection Sharing, and then on the shop computer set up your Internet via the Internet Connection Wizard as being a LAN connection.

If all goes well you should have a wireless network with shared internet. Keep in mind though that things like walls in between will hamper the range of the wireless units so if you can get a direct line of sight, then you should be set.

Check the product out at www.dlink.com.au.

I hope this helps.
0
The new generation of project management tools

With monday.com’s project management tool, you can see what everyone on your team is working in a single glance. Its intuitive dashboards are customizable, so you can create systems that work for you.

 
flanqueCommented:
Hi rdonchann,

Did that answer your question? Anything that might be able to add to clarify it?
0
 
rdonchannAuthor Commented:
Yes I read your answer. It seems kind of complicated compared to the solution above. Why would I want to mess with using access points when I can get by with just using a couple of cards by themselves? I am not knowledgable about networking at all but it looks to me like the simpler I can keep it the better.
0
 
flanqueCommented:
Overall, from my experience the wireless access points are more stable, plus you can set them up in bridge mode for more secure network browsing.
0
 
NoodlesWIUCommented:
Flanque is right.  However I dislike wireless unless im using a laptop.  I just really preffer hard-wiring.
0
 
bulbelCommented:
guys i have a little question!!
lets assume i use an access point in both sides furthermore i have to connect few computers in each side, what will i have to do? does the router comes before the acces point or....? i need some hints in this please. Thank you
0
 
flanqueCommented:
No, you can set up one access point in "Access Point Mode" which will be the central hub for wireless connectivity, and all the remote ends would be set up in "Wireless Client" mode. This is still "secure" for the most part by way of WEP keys. I would recommend a minimum of 256-bit WEP keys. If you can find AP products with greater then get those and use 'em.

0

Featured Post

Will You Be GDPR Compliant by 5/28/2018?

GDPR? That's a regulation for the European Union. But, if you collect data from customers or employees within the EU, then you need to know about GDPR and make sure your organization is compliant by May 2018. Check out our preparation checklist to make sure you're on track today!

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now