Reading a filename from command line.

I was wondering what is the correct way to read a filename from the command line?
Note: Not by prompting for and reading in a string.

Thanks
killer455Asked:
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marcin1Commented:
Here is the example how to handle arguments from the command line:

#include <string.h>
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
        if (argc > 1)
        {
                //here you can use filename
                printf("argument 1: %s", argv[1]);
        }
        return 0;
}

argc - number of arguments (including the name of the program)
argv - array containing the arguments

argv[0] is the name of your program

Now try to compile it and run with parameters
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tinchosCommented:
It can be done in the same way as in C


Your main function should look like this:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
   /* Use argc and argv as needed */
}

argc contains the number of command lines arguments + 1 (the first argument is the name of your executable).
argv is an array of strings (char pointers) - each string is a command line argument.

Suppose you call "Program.exe filename.txt"

argc = 2
argv[0] is "program.exe"
argv[1] is "filename.txt"
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n_fortynineCommented:
For example, if your executable is a.out
$ a.out infile.txt
then argv[0] would contain the executable name (possibly including path - but this is not certain)
and argv[1] is the char array "infile.txt"
so basically if you want to open this file:
ifstream in(argv[1]);
is what you can write (or call the open() function).

Notice that if you have included the path in the file name, all backslashes must be doubled:
Not A:\MyFolder\infile.txt but A:\\MyFolder\\infile.txt
(since the compiler will confuse \M and \i as predefined tags (like \n, \t etc.)

In MS-DOS, the symbol used is "/" so you wouldn't have to worry about that.
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killer455Author Commented:
Thanks for the help guys.  I guess you cant split only 20 points? i didnt see the "split" button.  Well look for more questions, i got a big (in my rookie opinion) project im working on.  :)

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