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Relative File Path

I have a java app that writes a file inside a tree pf directories. The program works fine in Windows, but under Linux I cannot use a realtive file path, it only works with an absolute.

The directory structure is like: DAT/dir1/dir2/dir3

How do I either get the directory path that my program was run from (ie so I can use that path + DAT/dir1/dir2) or write to one of those dirs without providing an absolute path?

Thanks.
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knight1093
Asked:
knight1093
  • 2
1 Solution
 
f_98Commented:
relative directories should work fine on linux; you could try adding a "./" and see if it works or

this will give you the current directory:

   public String getCurrentDir()
   {
      File dir1 = new File (".");
      String strCurrentDir = "";
      try  {
        strCurrentDir = dir1.getCanonicalPath();
      }
      catch(Exception e)  {
         e.printStackTrace();
      }
      return strCurrentDir;
   }
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knight1093Author Commented:
f_98, that is only giving me /home/user instead of /home/user/prog/dir, which is where my program is being run from. I also tried ./ and ../, but it didn't work.
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f_98Commented:
hmm, the closest thing i could think of right now is trying
getClass().getResource("Myclass.class");
which returns the URL of that class.

from somewhere else:

String resource = locate();
String mylocation = resource.trim().substring(resource.indexOf('C'),resource.lastIndexOf('/')).replace('/','\\') + "\\";

public String locate() {
        final URL loc = getClass().getResource( "YourClass.class" );
        try {
            String pathString;
            pathString = URLDecoder.decode( loc.getPath(), "UTF-8" );
            //System.out.println( "pathString: "+pathString );
            if( pathString.startsWith( "file:" ) )
            {
                pathString = pathString.substring( "file:".length() );
            }
            //System.out.println( "pathString: "+pathString );
            final int jarIndex = pathString.indexOf( ".jar!" );
            if( jarIndex > -1 )
            {
                pathString = pathString.substring( 0, jarIndex + ".jar".length() );
            }
            //System.out.println( "pathString: "+pathString );
            final String sep = System.getProperty( "file.separator" );
            final int pathSepIndex = pathString.lastIndexOf( sep );
            if( pathSepIndex > -1 )
            {
                pathString = pathString.substring( 0, pathSepIndex + sep.length() );
            }
            //System.out.println( "Jar file located at: " + pathString );
            return pathString;
        } catch( UnsupportedEncodingException uee ) {
        // this should never happen for UTF-8!!!
        }
        return "";
    }
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jimmackCommented:
System.getProperty("user.dir") will give you the current working directory.

I'm not sure you need this.  The following code handles a file in the directory from which the class is executed:

import java.io.*;

public class FilePathTest
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        File myFile = new File("Hello.tmp");
        System.out.println("Path = " + System.getProperty("user.dir"));
        try
        {
            System.out.println(myFile.getCanonicalPath());
        }
        catch (IOException ioe)
        {
            System.err.println("ioe: " + ioe.toString());
        }
    }
}

ie.  Executed from /home/jim/expertsexchange/FilePathTest, I get:

Path = /home/jim/expertsexchange/FilePathTest
/home/jim/expertsexchange/FilePathTest/Hello.tmp

If I go to my home directory and type:

java -cp expertsexchange/FilePathTest FilePathTest, I get:

Path = /home/jim
/home/jim/Hello.tmp

One other point.  If your code is designed to be used on multiple platforms, don't forget to use File.pathSeparator instead of "/" or "\" ;-)

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